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Software Quality - You Know It When You See It

Posted by Erik Dörnenburg  on  Mar 21, 2012

Erik Dörnenburg shares techniques for estimating code quality by collecting and analyzing data using the toxicity chart, metrics tree maps, size&complexity pyramid, complexity view, code city, etc.

Software Naturalism - Embracing the Real Behind the Ideal

Posted by Michael Feathers  on  Feb 17, 2012 5

Michael Feathers analyzes real code bases concluding that code is not nearly as beautiful as designers aspire to, discussing the everyday decisions that alter the code bit by bit.

Stop the Software Architecture Erosion

Posted by Bernhard Merkle  on  Sep 16, 2011

Bernhard Merkle advices on preventing architectural degradation of a project by using tools for constant monitoring of the code, exemplifying with an analysis of Ant, Findbugs and Eclipse.

Software Quality – You Know It when You See It

Posted by Erik Dörnenburg  on  Aug 30, 2011 1

Erik Dörnenburg explains how to use various visualization tools to spot patterns, trends and outliers in the code that are an indication of code quality level.

A Crash Course in Modern Hardware

Posted by Cliff Click  on  Jan 12, 2010 17

In this presentation from the JVM Languages Summit 2009, Cliff Click discusses the Von Neumann architecture, CISC vs RISC, the rise of multicore, Instruction-Level Parallelism (ILP), pipelining, out-of-order dispatch, static vs dynamic ILP, performance impact of cache misses, memory performance, memory vs CPU caching, examples of memory/CPU cache interaction, and tips for improving performance.

Controlling Your Architecture

Posted by Magnus Robertsson  on  Oct 22, 2009 3

Magnus Robertsson shows how to control the code architecture manually, statically and dynamically in order to avoid an architectural drift leading to a big-ball-of-mud. For that, he recommends ways to enforce the reference architecture through peer review, code analysis, and zero tolerance to warnings and errors.

Conceptual Algorithms

Posted by Tom Preston-Werner  on  Jan 17, 2009 5

In this talk from RubyFringe, GitHub's Tom Preston-Werner talks about a methodical approach to solving problems and debugging. Also: he explains how to use the "Deathbed Filter" for choosing projects.

JRuby: The Pain of Bringing an Off-Platform Dynamic Language to the JVM

Posted by Charles Nutter  on  Jan 07, 2009 3

In this presentation from the JVM Languages Summit 2008, Charles Nutter discusses bringing JRuby to the JVM, why Ruby is hard to implement, JIT compilation, precompilation, core Ruby implementation, Java library method access, method call semantics, scopes, open classes, heap-based frames, library challenges, strings, regexps, I/O, green threads, POSIX features, C lib support and future plans.

Ruby.rewrite(Ruby)

Posted by Reginald Braihwaite  on  Dec 04, 2008 4

In this RubyFringe talk, Reginald Braithwaite shows how to write Ruby that reads, writes, and rewrites Ruby. The demos include extending the Ruby language with conditional expressions, new forms of evaluation such as call-by-name and call-by-need, and more.

Fast Bytecodes for Funny Languages

Posted by Cliff Click  on  Dec 02, 2008

In this presentation from the JVM Languages Summit 2008, Cliff Click discusses how to optimize generated bytecode for running on the JVM. Click analyzes and reports on Java, Scala, Clojure, JRuby, JPC and JavaScript/Rhino and points out several places where each of them could increase their performance such as elimination of FixNums, escape analysis and best practices for testing bytecode.

Secure Programming with Static Analysis

Posted by Brian Chess  on  Aug 06, 2008 2

Creating secure code requires more than just good intentions. Programmers need to know how to make their code safe in an almost infinite number of scenarios and configurations. Static source code analysis can uncover the kinds of errors that lead directly to vulnerabilities and in this talk, Brian Chess frames the software security problem and shows how static analysis is part of the solution.

Venkat Subramaniam's Pragmatic Factors for Agile Success

Posted by Venkat Subramaniam  on  Mar 27, 2008 3

At NFJS Venkat Subramaniam, author with Andy Hunt of "Practices of an Agile Developer," shared his pragmatic approach to some of the important technical and non-technical factors contributing to project success, including: coding, developer attitude, debugging, mentoring and feedback.

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