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  • The 4 Questions of a Retrospective and Why They Work

    by Laura M. Waite and Collin Lyons on  Jul 08, 2013 1

    A Retrospective is a valuable way to improve how your team works together by reflecting on what has come before and using what you have learned to move ahead together. The authors present a structure with four simple questions to help you get started with using retrospectives in your team environment.

  • Dialogue Sheets Revisited

    by Allan Kelly on  Apr 22, 2013

    Last year Allan Kelly wrote an InfoQ article about a tool for retrospectives - Dialogue Sheets. A year and over 2000 downloads later he looks at how they are being used and ways they have been adapted in the wild.

  • DevOps @ Nokia Entertainment

    by John Clapham on  Jan 31, 2013

    DevOps@Nokia Entertainment is the first article of the “DevOps War Stories” series. Each month we hear what DevOps brings to a different organisation, we learn what worked and what didn’t, and chart the challenges faced during adoption.

Interview and Book Review: Essential Scrum

Posted by Ben Linders on  Dec 04, 2012

Essential Scrum by Kenny Rubin is a book about getting more out of Scrum. It’s an introduction to Scrum and its values, principles and practices, and a source of inspiration on how to apply it.

Interview and Book Review : The Retrospective Handbook

Posted by Anand Vishwanath on  Sep 17, 2012

Patrick Kua has recently published The Retrospective Handbook which provides practical advice on how to make retrospectives much more effective. 1

Dialogue Sheets: A new tool for retrospectives

Posted by Allan Kelly on  Jan 03, 2012

Dialogue sheets allow teams to hold facilitator-less retrospectives. They promote self-organization and encourage everyone to speak in the exercise. Resulting in great levels of participation. 10

The Retrospective Practice as a Vehicle for Leading Conceptual Change

Posted by Orit Hazzan and Yael Dubinsky on  Jun 14, 2011

This paper tells the story of the adaption process of agile software development with a focus on one mechanism – retrospective – we employ to guide team members realize the needed change.

Questioning the Retrospective Prime Directive

Posted by Linda Rising on  Feb 14, 2008

The 'Retrospective Prime Directive' is often used during retrospectives to encourage learning without recriminations. Here a group of senior practitioners looks at its benefits and difficulties. 11

The Secret Sauce of Highly Productive Software Development

Posted by Amr Elssamadisy and Deborah Hartmann Preuss on  Aug 14, 2007

Why do Agile teams get stuck in the just-average "norming" stage, never making it to the exciting high "performing" stage of team growth? The invisible "learning bottleneck" can stunt performance. 16

How To: Live and Learn with Retrospectives

Posted by Rachel Davies on  May 31, 2007

When we discard traditional SDLC rules, how should we work? Rachel Davies explains how teams can use Retrospectives to reflect on their process and to improve it gradually over time. 3

Good Agile Karma

Posted by Gunjan Doshi & Deborah Hartmann Preuss on  Jan 25, 2007

As we practice various Agile disciplines, the effects of our words and actions actively create, and re-create over time, the environment in which our teams and projects operate - for good or ill. 3

Book Excerpt: Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great

Posted by Esther Derby and Diana Larsen on  Aug 21, 2006

Retrospectives are traditionally held at the end of a project - too late to help. Agile teams need retrospectives that are iterative and incremental, so improvement can start as soon as possible.

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