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Stories of Using Real Options to Take Decisions

by Ben Linders on  Sep 27, 2013 2

Projects and product development is one long series of difficult decisions, says Pascal Van Cauwenberghe. Real Options can help you to take the right decision at the right time, even under difficult circumstances. At the Agile Tour Brussels conference, Pascal presented stories of his experiences with using real options in decision taking.

Reduce Waste by Changing from Waterfall to Agile

by Ben Linders on  Sep 19, 2013 4

Organizations adopt agile to be able to handle changes. Agile helps teams to deliver products that satisfy the needs of customers; products which do not contain unneeded (and unused) features. Lean software development says: everything not adding value to the customer is considered to be waste. How can a transition from waterfall to agile software development help organizations to reduce waste?

Agile Retrospectives, Can You Skip Them?

by Ben Linders on  Sep 05, 2013 2

Teams sometimes consider to skip a retrospective meeting, when they feel time pressure, or do not see direct benefits of doing one. Next they question themselves if they have to keep doing retrospectives? Agile retrospectives help teams to learn and improve continuously, and there are valid reasons to keep doing them also with mature teams.

Flexible Contract Template Now Available

by Shane Hastie on  Sep 03, 2013

Following on from the announcement of the Flexible Contract model that supports agile development at the Agile 2013 conference, Susan Atkinson and Gabrielle Benefield have released a version of the contract under Creative Commons licensing and made it available for download.

8th Annual State of Agile Development Survey Now Open

by Ben Linders on  Aug 22, 2013

The 8th annual State of Agile Development Survey was announced at the Agile 2013 conference. Previous surveys have provided insight into agile adoption. You can participate in the survey, and get the data before it goes public.

Sustainable Pace, How to Achieve and Improve it?

by Ben Linders on  Aug 15, 2013

Being one of the principles of the agile manifesto, sustainable pace is considered important by many to deploy agile. But achieving a sustainable pace can be difficult, and teams are often asked to improve their velocity. What did you do to adopt sustainable pace with your team? And how did you improve the speed in which your team delivers, and establish a new sustainable level?

Safety, Software, and Accelerated Learning

by Amr Elssamadisy on  Jul 12, 2013

Agile methods have the potential of creating great results. But those great results are not a guarantee; in fact anecdotal evidence suggests that those great results are only achieved by a small percentage of those teams and organizations adopting and adapting agile methods. There are invisible requirements for this success. One of these requirements seems to be safety.

Microsoft Is to Undergo Major Reorganization

by Abel Avram on  Jul 11, 2013

Microsoft has detailed their plan for a major reorganization. All OSes will be under one lead. Other engineering areas will be Apps, Cloud and Devices.

Why Do Teams Find It Difficult to Do Agile Retrospectives?

by Ben Linders on  Jul 11, 2013

Retrospectives are often considered to be a valuable agile technique, but sometimes teams have difficulties doing them: insufficient control of things, thinking that they can’t improve, difficulties defining good actions, or much complaining. Teams may find retrospectives boring, and a waste of their time. How to deal with this, and help teams to discover better ways to do retrospectives?

Licensing Restrictions Plague the new Portable Class Libraries

by Jonathan Allen on  Jun 25, 2013

Microsoft has been releasing Portable Class Library versions of some really important libraries including the BCL Portability Pack, Async, Stream Compression and ZIP Archives, and Microsoft HTTP Client Libraries. And with the newest version of Mono also supporting PCL, one would think this would be a huge win for cross-platform developers. But that’s not the case.

S is for Security

by Manuel Pais on  Jun 22, 2013

Frank Breedijk, security officer at Schuberg Philis, talks about the friction points between security and DevOps and how to collaborate to avoid them. Examples include automating security tests and environments, reducing scope of security audits to relevant system components only or allowing security fixes to jump the queue of changes to production.

Linda Rising Talks About Incentives at GOTO Amsterdam 2013

by Ben Linders on  Jun 18, 2013

The third annual GOTO Amsterdam conference covers Java, Mobile, Cloud, OpenSource, Lean/Agile, Architecture, New Languages & Process communities. The first day started with a keynote by Linda Rising, exploring research on incentives starting from the industrial age, and looked at how it is being doing in practice by managers with development teams. InfoQ interviewed Linda about her experiences.

DevOps Days Amsterdam Day 1 Focused on Continuous Delivery and DevOps Culture

by Manuel Pais on  Jun 15, 2013

The first day of DevOps Days Amsterdam had its focus split between continuous delivery and promoting a DevOps culture. Talks focused on how to automate the deployment pipeline but also system recovery in case of failure. On the culture side leveraging distinct personality types to successfully introduce changes and the positive impact of strong company culture on hiring were some of the takeaways.

Happy Melly: A Business Network to Help People to Become Happy Workers

by Ben Linders on  Jun 13, 2013 1

Inspired by the photo “Melly Shum hates her job”, Jurgen Appelo, Maarten Volders and Vasco Duarto initiated Happy Melly with the purpose to help people to become happy workers and live better lives. The Happy Melly business has now taken off to help organizations to survive in changing environments, with happy workers that are motivated to engage and contribute.

The New York Times Goes Digital: Technologizing an Originally Paper-Based Company

by Zef Hemel on  Jun 12, 2013

In 2006, The New York Times had 20 engineers, all located in a separate building off-site. Engineering and journalism were organized as completely separate entities, even ad sales departments were separate. How do you change a culture like this into a culture where technology drives and supports journalism?

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