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A Crash Course in Modern Hardware

Posted by Cliff Click  on  Jan 12, 2010 17

In this presentation from the JVM Languages Summit 2009, Cliff Click discusses the Von Neumann architecture, CISC vs RISC, the rise of multicore, Instruction-Level Parallelism (ILP), pipelining, out-of-order dispatch, static vs dynamic ILP, performance impact of cache misses, memory performance, memory vs CPU caching, examples of memory/CPU cache interaction, and tips for improving performance.

Data Grid Design Patterns

Posted by Brian Oliver  on  Nov 04, 2009

Brian Oliver explains a number of data grid design patters: Command, Functor, Store and Forward Messaging, and Push Replication. He also mentions some traditional patterns used so far and Coherence Incubator, a repository for design patterns reference implementations.

An Introduction to Data Grids

Posted by Cameron Purdy  on  Oct 10, 2009 1

Cameron Purdy explains how a data grid functions by using a partition topology for data access, update, recovery and local storage, accessing data using read/write-through and write behind, and invoking operations through Observable, QueryMap and InvocableMap interfaces. He also offers some examples of data grids solving complex problems and introduces Coherence, Oracle’s data grid solution.

Transforming the Reconciliation Process

Posted by Brian Oliver  on  Sep 23, 2009

Brian Oliver explains what the Reconciliation Process is, why the current approach to reconciliation based on client-server is no longer suitable and how data grids and event based reconciliation might help.

Multicore Programming in Erlang

Posted by Ulf Wiger  on  Jul 16, 2009

Ulf Wiger shows typical Erlang programs, patterns that scale well on multicore and patterns that don't, profiling and debugging parallel applications and ensuring correct behaviour with QuickCheck.

RESTful Enterprise Development

Posted by Ian Robinson  on  Apr 29, 2009 2

In this presentation, recorded at QCon San Francisco, ThoughtWorks' Ian Robinson explains how a RESTful HTTP approach can be applied in an Enterprise project. He makes use of many of the techniques that make HTTP a powerful protocol, including caching, hypermedia, and the use of standard formats such as Atom Syndication for event notification.

HTTP Status Report

Posted by Mark Nottingham  on  Apr 19, 2009 3

HTTP is one of the most successful protocols in the world, and more and more developers are using it to do more than drive HTML UIs. In this presentation, recorded at QCon San Francisco 2008, HTTPbis WG chair Mark Nottingham gives an update on the current status of the HTTP protocol in the wild, and the ongoing work to clarify the HTTP specification.

Facebook: Science and the Social Graph

Posted by Aditya Agarwal  on  Mar 25, 2009 9

In this presentation filmed during QCon SF 2008, Aditya Agarwal discusses Facebook’s architecture, more exactly the software stack used, presenting the advantages and disadvantages of its major components: LAMP (PHP, MySQL), Memcache, Thrift, Scribe.

REST: A Pragmatic Introduction to the Web's Architecture

Posted by Stefan Tilkov  on  Jan 29, 2009 6

In this presentation, recorded at QCon London, Stefan Tilkov introduces the key principles of REST, explaining the differences to other distributed systems architectures and highlighting its benefits. Topics covered include mapping business logic to resource interactions, hypermedia, and documentation.

Rockstar Memcaching

Posted by Tobias Lütke  on  Oct 28, 2008

In this presentation from RubyFringe, Tobias Lütke talks about memcached, the widely used caching solution. Tobias explains how to use it and gives some practical tips on what not to do.

Jinesh Varia About Amazon Alexa Web Service's Architecture

Posted by Jinesh Varia  on  Aug 15, 2008 3

In this presentation, Jinesh Varia, a Web Services Evangelist at Amazon, talks about the architecture of one of Amazon's web services called Alexa. Jinesh explains how Amazon has reached scalability, performance and reduced costs for the Alexa service.

The Top 10 Ways to Botch Enterprise Java Application Scalability and Reliability

Posted by Cameron Purdy  on  Jul 23, 2008 8

In this presentation, Cameron Purdy discusses Java scaling. Topics include performance improvement versus scaling improvement, serial bottlenecks, queue theory, rewriting existing frameworks, avoiding the database, single points of failure, avoiding abstractions, disaster recovery, one-size-fits-all architecture, large JVM heaps, network failures, and trusting product claims.

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