BT

Oracle Database Gets In-Memory

by Roopesh Shenoy on Jul 28, 2014 |

Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.2) is now available and includes the much anticipated “In-memory” feature, along with several other improvements.

Some important features introduced –

  • In-memory Column Store – Storing of objects in memory in a  Columnar format, with much better performance for scans, joins and aggregates
  • In-memory Aggregation- improves performance of star queries and reduces CPU usage
  • Advanced Index Compression
  • APPROX_COUNT_DISTINCT() – significantly faster than exact aggregation for large volumes of data, with negligible deviance
  • Attribute Clustering- allows storing logically related data in close physical proximity. Can greatly reduce amount of data to be processed and lead to better compression ratios
  • Full-Database Caching- Can be used to cache the entire database in-memory when the cache size is greater than the whole database size
  • JSON Support- Support for storing, querying and indexing JSON data, and allowing the database to enforce that the JSON stored conforms to the JSON rules

Kevin Closson points out that the In-Memory feature, which is licensed separately, could be used accidentally since it is on by default after the upgrade, and recommends caution.  

You can read the “new features” guide for a detailed list of improvements in this release. 

Hello stranger!

You need to Register an InfoQ account or or login to post comments. But there's so much more behind being registered.

Get the most out of the InfoQ experience.

Tell us what you think

Allowed html: a,b,br,blockquote,i,li,pre,u,ul,p

Email me replies to any of my messages in this thread

better late than never by Diego Visentin

DB2 and SQL Server already have these features with better technical aspects.

PS:
if your app is locked to Oracle, you can try compatibility tricks (www.ibm.com/developerworks/data/library/techart...)

Re: better late than never by Cameron Purdy

No, DB2 and MSSQL Server do not "already have these features with better technical aspects". Some of these features have analogues in other products, which is hardly surprising, but to claim that DB2 has "better technical aspects" is laughable. Have you ever used DB2? ... oops, a quick Google search later and I realize that as the you are probably one of the few people who has actually used DB2:

IBM Business Partner:Systems Integrator
WebSphere products that I use:
WebSphere Application Server
WebSphere Smash
WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus
WebSphere MQ
IBM WebSphere Portal
WebSphere Adapters
Business Process Management
WebSphere Process Server
WebSphere Application Server
WebSphere Smash
WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus
WebSphere MQ
IBM WebSphere Portal
WebSphere Adapters
Business Process Management
WebSphere Process Server
WebSphere Application Server
WebSphere Smash
WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus
WebSphere MQ
IBM WebSphere Portal
WebSphere Adapters
Business Process Management
WebSphere Process Server
WebSphere Application Server
WebSphere Smash
WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus
WebSphere MQ
IBM WebSphere Portal
WebSphere Adapters
Business Process Management
WebSphere Business Events
WebSphere Process Server
WebSphere Integration Developer
WebSphere Lombardi Edition
WebSphere Decision Server
IBM Integration Designer
WebSphere Sensor Events
WebSphere MQ Telemetry
IBM Mobile Foundation
IBM Worklight
WebSphere Application Server
WebSphere Smash
WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus
WebSphere MQ
IBM WebSphere Portal
WebSphere Adapters
Business Process Management
WebSphere Business Events
WebSphere Process Server
WebSphere Integration Developer
WebSphere Lombardi Edition
WebSphere Decision Server
IBM Integration Designer
WebSphere Sensor Events
WebSphere MQ Telemetry
IBM Mobile Foundation
IBM Worklight
WebSphere Application Server
WebSphere Smash
WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus
WebSphere MQ
IBM WebSphere Portal
WebSphere Adapters
Business Process Management
WebSphere Business Events
WebSphere Process Server
WebSphere Integration Developer
WebSphere Lombardi Edition
WebSphere Decision Server
IBM Integration Designer
WebSphere Sensor Events
WebSphere MQ Telemetry
IBM Mobile Foundation
IBM Worklight
WebSphere Application Server
WebSphere Smash
WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus
WebSphere MQ
IBM WebSphere Portal
WebSphere Adapters
Business Process Management
WebSphere Business Events
WebSphere Process Server
WebSphere Integration Developer
WebSphere Lombardi Edition
WebSphere Decision Server
IBM Integration Designer
WebSphere Sensor Events
WebSphere MQ Telemetry
IBM Mobile Foundation
IBM Worklight
WebSphere Application Server
WebSphere Smash
WebSphere Enterprise Service Bus
WebSphere MQ
IBM WebSphere Portal
WebSphere Adapters
Business Process Management
WebSphere Business Events
WebSphere Process Server
WebSphere Integration Developer
WebSphere Lombardi Edition
WebSphere Decision Server
IBM Integration Designer
WebSphere Sensor Events
WebSphere MQ Telemetry
IBM Mobile Foundation
IBM Worklight


Peace,

Cameron Purdy | Oracle
For the sake of full disclosure, I work at Oracle. The opinions and views expressed in this post are my own, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of my employer.

Re: better late than never by Diego Visentin

You are right, I use DB2 since its OS/2 version (and then used also on UNIX, Windows and zOs). My colleagues instead are certified on MS SQL Server and my company is a MS gold certified partner. Sorry, we are not also an Oracle partner but I know its database quite well since version 8 and I use it every day on EAM systems of our customers.
So my very personal point of view is that every major database is quite good in these days. But some vendors are more pro-actives about customer needs. E.g. SAP HANA was the first product to push in-memory approach out of its niche. Then IBM BLU Acceleration have made very happy some customers (www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/41397.wss ...sorry for this advertising but from yours words seems that nobody uses DB2 ;-))
Also last MS SQL Server supports columnar index: simple solution for one of the best easy-to-use databases.
So I was very curios about new features of Oracle 12c. After reading Oracle docs and whitepapers, I really don't found any incredible innovations. Maybe I'm wrong but e.g. in-memory feature seems to me made only to answer to the competitors and follow the groove.
I'll be very happy to try on field the new Oracle db and maybe I'll change my opinions. In the meanwhile you can read something about other db.... I know that you work for Oracle but sometime also others do interesting stuff :-)

Re: better late than never by Cameron Purdy

I know that you work for Oracle but sometime also others do interesting stuff :-)

Absolutely! Our industry continues to churn out tons of interesting stuff!

I have used DB2, although not much in the past 10 years though, mainly because I didn't find it to be "developer friendly" for my uses. I've used Microsoft SQL Server quite extensively, although not much in the past few years (lack of time).

One challenge for Oracle is that the database already has so many features, and when a new feature is added, that feature has to work with all of the existing ones, too! Just think about all of the supported hardware platforms, the various operating systems, the clustering functionality, the encryption and security features, the hardware integration with Exadata and the Oracle database appliance, the built-in Java and PL/SQL support, the DataGuard functionality, the new multi-tenancy capabilities, etc.

Peace,

Cameron Purdy | Oracle

Re: better late than never: better facts than opinions by Paul Zikopoulos

I thought this reply was kind of opinionated - and not trying to start anything, but it just went on to talk about a bunch of IBM products where DB2 exists and Google searches, it was just odd facts to your point.

Since I did an Oracle certification at one point, know the competitive aspects of Oracle I'd say pretty damn well, and wrote books on DB2, I thought I'd share 1/10th of what I think why someone could hypothesize that the Oracle announce is a little behind per the original comment. (Disclaimer: it's rather new, so I've not put my hands on it.)

Aside from the fact that over the last 1/2 decade, Oracle has been quite behind on the compression front to be honest. And now they've created an in-memory data cache that has a columnar format (columnar before used to be PAX as you are aware for Exadata), I'd wonder aloud to start about this...

I think the compression expectations advertised by Oracle as 2-4x speaks volumes and I think (I could be wrong) this can be added on top of EHCC for Exadata? So there are 2 add-ons? Perhaps a third for transactional? These are weak numbers - BLU Acceleration users are seeing on average of 10x.

I think the big issue I have with the Oracle solution is all the data has to sit in memory - so in a BigData world how do you do that? And since there is a row store that caches the data and now a column store, I'd say the data is getting double cached. And as DBAs are faced with the task of managing what is in the cache, they do so in a manner that says "What might get queried". I mean as a DBA here I have to say what tables to store in memory as column, and I'm likely to (forced to) buy Table Partitioning to get more granularization because memory is limited comparatively speaking, then figured out what's active and cold...kind of a headache.

So i have to be honest here, and yes I work at IBM so that's fair to say I'm bias too, but I see a lot of pretty leading edge stuff in the DB2 product and some interesting points on the Oracle side. And I've not really even scratched the surface of some of the things going on in the BLU Acceleration technology or some of the stuff that sits in my mind as troublesome as I look more and more at the Oracle stuff

One final thing, DB2 happens to host BLU Acceleration technology as ONE PRODUCT that can have it. You will find it in others and more coming soon. It's a technology, it isn't DB2 per se.

I guess I see the Oracle solution as more of a memory cache and not an in-memory analytics database if I where to write a single Subject line and to me...

Allowed html: a,b,br,blockquote,i,li,pre,u,ul,p

Email me replies to any of my messages in this thread

Allowed html: a,b,br,blockquote,i,li,pre,u,ul,p

Email me replies to any of my messages in this thread

5 Discuss

Educational Content

General Feedback
Bugs
Advertising
Editorial
InfoQ.com and all content copyright © 2006-2014 C4Media Inc. InfoQ.com hosted at Contegix, the best ISP we've ever worked with.
Privacy policy
BT