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  • Electron 3 Release Increases Stability

    The Electron team recently announced the release of version 3 of Electron. This release includes numerous enhancements and improvements including support for reading massive files, better APIs for managing applications, and logging and performance measurement capabilities.

  • Google Releases Puppeteer 1.0

    Puppeteer 1.0 has been released and includes dozens of improvements, including measurement of JavaScript heap and page performance, and code coverage information for JavaScript and CSS.

  • W3C Releases HTML 5.2 As Official Recommendation

    The W3C released the HTML 5.2 update to the HTML specification as an official recommendation on December 14, 2017. This update adds new features like the dialog element, obsoletes old ones like the HTML plugins system, and integrates work from other W3C committees such as support for the Payments Request API and the Presentation API.

  • Firefox Quantum Commits to Cross-Browser Extension Architecture

    With the Firefox 57 “Quantum” release, Firefox now only supports extensions based on the WebExtensions API, joining Chrome and Edge in supporting extension development with pure HTML, CSS, and JavaScript based on a cross-browser shared extension architecture.

  • WebAssembly Now Supported across All Browsers

    With releases on September 19 for Safari and October 31 for Edge, Apple and Microsoft join Google and Mozilla in providing support for WebAssembly in production browsers. All four companies’ browsers can now run code compiled to the wasm binary format.

  • Google's Puppeteer Joins Crowd of Headless Chrome Tools

    Google's new tool, Puppeteer, is a custom-built Node API used to control headless Chrome. It joins a number of existing community tools that solve the very painful problem of working with the Chrome DevTools Protocol. The addition of Google's tool will hopefully result in more options and capabilities for web developers.

  • Google Is to Remove Support for PNaCl

    After de-staffing the PNaCL/NaCl team last year and adding default support for WebAssembly in Chrome in March of this year, Google has officially announced the retirement of PNaCl in favor of WebAssembly.

  • Updates to Google Chrome DevTools

    The upcoming version of Chrome DevTools has a number of new features that can help developers build faster web pages and have an easier time debugging complex asynchronous code. At Google I/O 2017, Paul Irish presented a State of the Union showcasing a number of these new features.

  • Phantom.js Maintainer Steps down, Leaving Project's Future in Doubt

    The maintainer of the headless browser testing framework, Phantom.js, has decided to step down due to the release of a headless version of Chromium. It's unclear if the project's founder will be able to find enough help to continue.

  • Browser Vendors Start Shipping WebAssembly by Default

    The browser vendors working on WebAssembly have reached a "consensus" on an initial implementation set, allowing browsers to ship it on by default. While this is an important milestone, the initial implementation won't immediately result in significant uptake by developers as important features such as DOM integration and garbage collection are not yet part of the spec.

  • Chrome and Firefox Start Warning of Insecure Sites

    Starting with Chrome 56 and Firefox 51, browsers will start warning users if they browse a non-HTTPS site that contains a password or credit card input field.

  • Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla Urge Site Operators to Replace SHA–1 Certificates

    Following their SHA–1 deprecation plans announced last year, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla detailed recently their timelines to remove support for SHA–1 certificates from their flagship browsers. Researchers at security firm Venafi found however, that 35% of analyzed websites are still using SHA–1 certificates.

  • Blisk, A New Browser for Developers

    Blisk is a Chromium-based browser that brings together the performance of Chrome and the developer support found in Firefox Developer Edition.

  • Chrome 54 Kills YouTube Flash Embeds

    Google has launched Chrome 54, further side lining Flash in the browser by using HTML5 for YouTube embed. The stable release rewrites YouTube Flash embeds, so that when a Flash embed for YouTube is detected, the browser will automatically use HTML5 instead. Google said that the change had been made "to reduce the overall usage of Flash in Chrome."

  • Profiling and Optimizing V8 Memory Consumption

    For the last few months, the V8 team has focused on reducing the memory consumed by the V8 engine, including work on the new Ignition interpreter, and improvements to V8’s parser and compilers. A key enabler of this process was profiling V8 memory usage using specific tools against a benchmark, as explained by V8 engineers Ulan Degenbaev, Michael Lippautz, Hannes Payer, and Toon Verwaest.

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