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InfoQ Homepage Domain Modeling Content on InfoQ

  • Michael Feathers Wants Error Elimination to Be a Design Driver

    Michael Feathers finds errors fascinating, but acknowledges that most developers don't spend a lot of time focusing on them. He also thinks most error handling is kind of giving up. Although best known for his books about working with legacy code, Feathers used his keynote presentation at Explore DDD 2018 to discuss how eliminating errors can be a design driver for software systems.

  • Finding Bounded Contexts Using Domain Storytelling

    When working with Domain-Driven Design (DDD), bounded context is a core concept. Domain storytelling is a way of finding how people and systems work together within a domain which then can be used to identify the bounded contexts and how they are interconnected, Stefan Hofer and Henning Schwentner explained at the recent DDD Europe 2018 conference in Amsterdam.

  • Vaughn Vernon Uses Reactive DDD to Model Uncertainty in Microservices

    Microservices and reactive systems bring with them uncertainty about messages arriving out of order, multiple times, or not at all. How to react to such uncertainty is a business decision, says Vaughn Vernon, and is best captured by modeling the uncertainty using concepts of Domain-Driven Design.

  • Eric Evans: Domain-Driven Design Even More Relevant Now

    Eric Evans, author of Domain-Driven Design, said the concepts in the book he wrote in 2003 are even more relevant now than they were 14 years ago. As the range of tools and technologies has expanded, some lend themselves to the principles of DDD better than others we've had in the past. Evans said, "DDD is not about technology, but is not indifferent about technology."

  • Capture - Embed - Protect, Guidelines for Domain-Driven Design

    When using the core philosophy and the practices of DDD as guidelines for software design and development, they can be summarized in three principles: Capture – Embed – Protect, Steven A. Lowe claimed in his presentation at this year’s DDD eXchange conference. Capture the domain model. Embed the model in the code. Protect the domain model from corruption from other domains.

  • Bringing the Domain Back to Software Development

    If you read the business press of today, you will find that the business side of the world sees IT as an impediment that holds them back. To overcome this, we need to shift focus from the machines to the domains and start reading and learning about the domains we are working in, David West noted in his presentation at the recent DDD Europe Conference in Amsterdam.

  • Eric Evans: Is Domain-Driven Design Beneficial for Software Development?

    The last couple of years the interest in Domain-Driven Design (DDD) has increased, Eric Evans noted in his keynote at the recent DDD eXchange conference in London. He thinks that we are in a time when developers care more about design, partially because we are working more with distributed systems where models have a higher value.

  • Working with Domain Experts in a DDD World

    Conversations with domain experts and the language used are central in Domain-Driven Design (DDD), but often this is hard because we don’t speak the same language, explained Cyrille Martraire in his presentation at the Domain-Driven Design Europe conference earlier this year when sharing his experiences working with domain experts in DDD-driven environments.

  • Aggregates, Entities and Value Objects in Domain-Driven Design

    Move as much as possible of the behaviour away from the Entities into Value Objects when working with Aggregates, As more behaviour is needed this is added as new value objects, Paul Rayner recommends in a series of blog posts covering aggregates, entities and value objects, all concepts from Domain-Driven Design (DDD).

  • Domain Modelling Using Event Storming

    By gathering all domain experts and developers in a room, provide them with a paper roll, lots of colored post-its and a facilitator they may in hours create the best model ever, Alberto Brandolini suggested at the recent DDD Exchange conference in London.

  • Using the Domain Driven Design Bounded Context Concept to Shrink a Large Domain Model

    Bounded Context concept from Domain Driven Design (DDD) can be used to divide a large model into smaller models using the Database Context (DbContext class) in Entity Framework (EF). Bounded Context creates smaller, more cohesive models with boundaries between models.

  • Greg Young on using Event Store as a Read Model

    Greg Young, the lead architect behind the Event Store, recently talked about the Projections Library in the Event Store and how it can be used as a Read Model. In his presentation Greg explained what the Projections Library is, together with its main use cases. He also presented a number of examples of practical use.

  • OpenXava 4.5 Supports JPA Inheritance Mapping and Automated Business Logic

    The latest version of OpenXava, a Java framework for rapid development of enterprise applications, supports all strategies of JPA inheritance mapping and the Automated Business Logic (ABL) library. OpenXava version 4.5 was released last month.

  • Interview: Eric Evans on the State of DDD

    At QCon San Francisco, 2008, Eric Evans answers questions about his recent activities and the evolution of DDD. During the interview he responds to questions about the relationship of DDD to usability, to FIT and FITnesse type testing, technology tools, and domain-specific languages. He also speaks about the DDD community as a whole.

  • SOA and DDD

    In a recent entry, Phillip Calcado asks the question "What Is A Service?" and then goes on to describe how the answer to this lies with Domain Driven Design and ensuring that all stakeholders in an SOA development share the same understanding.

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