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  • Firefox Quantum Commits to Cross-Browser Extension Architecture

    With the Firefox 57 “Quantum” release, Firefox now only supports extensions based on the WebExtensions API, joining Chrome and Edge in supporting extension development with pure HTML, CSS, and JavaScript based on a cross-browser shared extension architecture.

  • Managed Extensibility Framework: What It is and Where It is Going

    As the name implies, Managed Extensibility Framework is a framework for extending .NET applications. In a recent Channel 9 interview Oleg Lvovitch and Kevin Ransom talked about the history of MEF and what’s planed for version 2.

  • MIT introduces Oracle for Object-Oriented Programmers

    In a recent news article the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has introduced a technology for automatically remembering connections between objects. The provided system determines how objects in a large software project interact, so it can inform latecomers which objects they will need to design certain types of functions.

  • Creating Add-Ins for Expression Web 4

    The hallmark of any good IDE is its extensibility. If developers can’t improve their own tools then they won’t see productivity improvements over time. The same goes for web designers, which is why Microsoft’s Expression Web 4 now offers an add-in model based on HTML+JavaScript.

  • Managed Extensions for Internet Explorer

    With .NET 4.0, writing reliable managed extensions for Internet Explorer has become possible. Unlike previous versions, each extension will run against the CLR it was compiled for instead of mindlessly grabbing the most recent version. Alas, COM interfaces are still needed.

  • Extensible Caching Added to .NET 4.0

    Microsoft’s Patterns and Practices caching framework has been promoted to a part of the core .NET Framework. This framework provides a basic in-memory cache with trigger-based cache invalidation and a common wrapper for more advanced caching frameworks to share.

  • JUnit 4.7: Per-Test rules

    JUnit 4.7, which has just reached Release Candidate stage includes a significant new feature: Rules. Rules are, in essence, another extension mechanism for JUnit, which can be used to add functionality to JUnit on a per-test basis. Most examples of custom runners in earlier versions of JUnit can be replaced by Rules, and new capabilities have already been added.

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