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  • Establishing Autonomy and Responsibility with Networks of Teams

    Working in outdated ways causes people to quit their work. Pim de Morree suggests structuring organizations into networks of autonomous teams and creating meaningful work through a clear purpose and direction. According to him, we can work better, be more successful, and have more fun at the same time.

  • How Norway's Largest Bureaucracy Optimises for Fast Flow

    To optimise for fast flow, the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration has adopted a teams-first approach. High-performing teams need autonomy, and they also require direction and alignment. Solutions should be adopted by the teams within their context, abilities, and cognitive capacity.

  • Building an Intentional Organisation: a Holistic Approach

    Building an intentional organisation requires a mindset that considers all organisational building blocks holistically. Leadership is key; actions that managers take have organisational consequences which need to be aligned to design an organisation that can achieve its purpose.

  • DOES 2019: BMW Journey to 100% Agile and BizDevOps Product Portfolio

    BMW presented why and how they transformed their IT to 100% agile and BizDevOps. They adopted a holistic approach with four focus areas: Process, Structure, Technology and People & Culture, allowing them to move from project to products.

  • Cultivating High-Performing Teams in Hypergrowth

    To support their hypergrowth, N26 created a shared picture about what to work on, how to do the work, and the organisational structure. Called the Target Operating Model, it has helped them grow while maximising team autonomy and alignment. At QCon New York 2019, Patrick Kua, chief scientist at N26, spoke about cultivating high-performing teams in an organisation that’s going through hypergrowth.

  • DOES London: Mark Schwartz on War & Peace & IT

    Mark Schwartz, former CIO and self-described iconoclast, spoke recently at DevOps Enterprise Summit London. Schwartz is the author of three books published by IT Revolution: ‘The Art of Business’, ‘A Seat at the Table’ and ‘War & Peace & IT,’ and is currently an enterprise strategist at Amazon Web Services. 

  • Organizational Refactoring at Mango

    To increase agility, companies can descale themselves into value centers in charge of a business strategic initiative, with end-to-end responsibility and with full access to the information regarding customer needs. You need to create spaces where people can cross-collaborate and learn, using for instance self-organized improvement circles, Communities of Practice or an internal Open Source model.

  • The New CIO: Leading IT the Mark Schwartz Way

    Mark Schwartz, formerly CIO at the US Citizenship and Immigration Services and now enterprise strategist at AWS, spoke at the DevOps Enterprise Summit in London about what it means to lead IT.

  • Spanning the Business and Technology Divide: A Talk with UBS, LBG and ITV

    Prior to this year’s DevOps Enterprise Summit in London, InfoQ hosted a video panel sponsored by IT Revolution and featuring speakers from the DevOps Enterprise Summit Events: Jelena Laketic from UBS, Mark Howell from Lloyds Banking Group and Tom Clark from ITV.

  • The Economics of Microservices: Phil Calçado Recommends Avoiding ‘Microliths’ at CraftConf

    At CraftConf 2017 Phil Calçado presented “The Economics of Microservices”. The key takeaway from the talk: the ‘Inverse Conway Maneuver’ can be a useful tool to shape an application’s architecture during a migration away from a monolith, but this can lead to creating ‘microliths’ unless the ‘transaction cost’ of creating a new service is lowered to below the cost of adding to an existing monolith.

  • Organizing over Organization

    In the coming years we will see less organizations, but not less organizing. Organizing is a daily activity to get things done, but we don't necessarily need organizations to do things. When individuals are subordinate to the organization, it's an inhibitor for adopting modern management approaches.

  • Scaling Teams to Grow Effective Organizations

    When organizations are growing fast it can be a challenge to keep them sane and to achieve what you actually want to achieve by hiring more people: getting more done. Alexander Grosse talked about how you scale teams to build an effective organization at Spark the Change London 2016. He explored the five domains of scaling teams: Hiring, People Management, Organization, Culture, and Communication.

  • Overcoming Paradigms to Become Truly Agile

    Truly agile is what you are, and to become agile you need to overcome paradigms, argues Arie van Bennekum, co-author of the agile manifesto. It takes "being agile" and not "doing agile" to achieve success. Agile is an interaction concept based on the values and principles of the agile manifesto. Technology facilitates agile working, but tools don’t make you agile.

  • How to Study and Apply Ideas from Successful Organisations

    Studying successful organisations can inspire you and provide ideas to improve your own organisation. Helena Moore explains how reading case studies about high performance leadership and culture from organisations like Netflix, Zappos, and Virgin, and visiting organisations like Timpson has helped to understand what makes these organisations successful and to find ways to apply them.

  • Riley Newman on How Airbnb Uses Data Science

    Riley Newman, head of data science at Airbnb, recently published an article describing how the Californian startup defines and uses data science. He explains that data can be seen as the voice of the customers, and data science as an act of interpretation. He also details several initiatives that have been particularly important for scaling data science.

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