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  • Sharing Experiences from a Microservices Journey

    In our continued effort to showcase lessons learned by microservices practitioners, we look at an article Piotr Gankiewicz has recently written with his own tips and tricks. These include references to CQRS, asynchronous architectures, service discovery and how choosing the right database for each service is important.

  • Confluent Announces Kafka for the Enterprise with Multi-Datacenter Replication

    Confluent Enterprise latest version supports multi-datacenter replication, automatic data balancing, and cloud migration capability. Confluent, provider of the Apache Kafka based streaming platform, announced last week the new features for Confluent Enterprise, to help build streaming data pipelines and develop stream processing applications.

  • Netflix Zuul Gets a Makeover to a Asynchronous and Non-Blocking Architecture

    Rags Srinivas caught up with engineering manager at Netflix, Mikey Cohen, regarding their major re-architecture of their Zuul gateway for microservices. Cohen talks about the journey and walks through the motivation and challenges of this significant effort.

  • A Sample Serverless Microservice Architecture from Autodesk

    In the webcast entitled "What's Better Than Microservices? Serverless Microservices," Alan Williams (Autodesk), Asha Chakrabarty (Amazon) and Alan Ho (Apigee) discuss the architecture of a serverless microservice built with lambda functions with Apigee end-points running on AWS.

  • Lagom, a New Microservices Framework

    Lightbend, the company behind Akka, has released an open source microservices framework, Lagom built on their Reactive Platform, in particular the Play Framework and the Akka family of products together with ConductR for deployment. By default, Lagom is message-driven and asynchronous, and using distributed CQRS persistence patterns with event sourcing as the primary implementation.

  • A Critical Look at CQRS

    Looking at Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) in a larger architectural context there are other architectural styles available. There are database technologies solving the same problems but in a simpler way, Udi Dahan states looking into ways of approaching CQRS. There is also a way that fulfils a lot of the CQRS goals but with fewer moving parts when CQRS is really needed.

  • Introducing CQRS and Event Sourcing with a Demo Application

    Improving on his understanding of the architecture and patterns involved in Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS), Sacha Barber has created a complete CQRS demo application including event sourcing and an article with a cross examination of the inner workings.

  • Leslie Lamport on Distributed Systems and Precise Thinking

    Leslie Lamport is the author of some of the most cited computer science papers and won a Turing Award in 2013 for his seminal work in distributed and concurrent systems. This is a summary of an interview that Lamport gave to Software Engineering Radio touching themes such as his early work in distributed systems and the importance of precise thinking in programming.

  • Lessons Learned Building Distributed Systems at Bitly

    At the Bacon Conference last May, bitly Lead Application Developer Sean O'Connor explained the most relevant lessons bitly developers learned while building a distributed system that handles 6 billions clicks per month.

  • The Strengths and Weaknesses of Microservices

    There has been significant buzz around microservices lately, enough to generate some hype. After implementing heavy and cumbersome SOA solutions for more than a decade, are microservices the solution the industry has been waiting for? Or, are microservices simpler than monolithic solutions?

  • Scalability in a Reactive World

    We have to maximize locality of reference and minimize contention to make systems scale, Jonas Bonér, creator of the Akka project, stated in a recent presentation about scalability in reactive systems. By using a share nothing architecture, build on an event-driven foundation and adhering to core principles that have been proven to work for ages we can write really scalable systems.

  • Akka Actors vs. Java EJBs from a High-Level Concurrency Perspective

    There are both commonalities and some differences when comparing architectural principles and coding styles in Akka Actors and Java EE 7 Enterprise JavaBeans, specifically stateless session beans and JMS message-driven beans, Dr Gerald Loeffler concludes in a recent introductory talk when explaining and comparing the three approaches from a high-level concurrency view.

  • Greg Young on Documents and Processes as an Alternative to Events

    Not all systems are based on events or facts. In some problem spaces events make complete sense; they are about facts that are happening over periods of time. But a lot of systems are instead focused on information that flow through a process, Greg Young explained at DDD Exchange Day in London last week, using handling of a mortgage application inside a bank as an example.

  • Vaughn Vernon on Advanced Architecture Styles with DDD

    Using the Hexagonal architecture style allows for delaying decisions for architectural mechanisms and promotes using the same internal API irrespective of type of client, Vaughn Vernon explained last week when describing different architecture styles from a DDD perspective; the classical Layered Architecture and the more advanced Hexagonal and Actor Model styles.

  • New.NET Async Control Flow Explained

    Alan Berman recently explained the details of how the new Async and Await keywords impact the flow of control. Using these keywords allows an asynchronous function's return values to be processed without using explicitly defined callbacks. This allows for more natural code grouping, as calling and processing of an asynchronous function can occur in the same function.

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