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  • Q&A on the Scrum Field Guide - 2nd Edition

    by Ben Linders on  Apr 07, 2016 1

    The Scrum Field Guide - 2nd Edition by Mitch Lacey is a "what to expect" book for organizations transitioning to agile, which aims to help teams to deal with issues that occur and fine-tune their own implementation. An interview about the essentials of Scrum, sprint length, full time Scrum masters, making time available for solving defects, preventing bad hires, and increasing benefits from Scrum.

  • Q&A on The Agile Mind-Set

    by Ben Linders on  Nov 15, 2015

    Gil Broza explores agile values, beliefs and principles, and explains how they can be used to drive agile adoption in his book The Agile Mind-set. The book provides ideas, examples, and anecdotes that organizations can use to make a shift to agile.

  • Q&A on Kanban Change Leadership

    by Ben Linders on  Aug 27, 2015

    In the book Kanban Change Leadership Klaus Leopold and Sigi Kaltenecker explore how Kanban can be deployed to get change done in organizations and to build a culture of continuous improvement. An interview on doing change in small steps, solving problems, using WIP limits, priorities and classes of service in Kanban, using the Theory of Constraints with Kanban, and getting results with Kanban.

Author Q&A on Agile Value Delivery - Beyond the Numbers

Posted by Shane Hastie on  Aug 05, 2015

Larry Cooper and Jen Stone have written a book which provides advice and techniques for blending agile practices with portfolio, program and project management, taking a value focused approach.

Probabilistic Project Planning Using Little’s Law

Posted by Dimitar Bakardzhiev on  Jun 21, 2015

Little’s Law helps teams that use user stories for planning and tracking project execution, with a project buffer to manage inherent uncertainty of a fixed-bid project and protect its delivery date. 4

Using Experiments and Data to Innovate and Build Products Customers Actually Use

Posted by Ben Linders on  May 28, 2015

An interview with Jan Bosch about getting benefits from increasing delivery speed, steps after adopting Agile and DevOps, using experiments to innovate, and practices for experimentation.

Evo: The Agile Value Delivery Process, Where ‘Done’ Means Real Value Delivered; Not Code

Posted by Tom Gilb & Kai Gilb on  Jan 26, 2015

This article describes what ‘Evo’ is at core, and how it is different from other Agile practices, and why ‘done’ should mean ‘value delivered to stakeholders’. 1

#NoEstimates Project Planning Using Monte Carlo Simulation

Posted by Dimitar Bakardzhiev on  Dec 01, 2014

This article shows how to do planning using reference class forecasting with the #NoEstimates paradigm which promises more accuracy in forecasts. 13

Tradeoffs: Giving up Certainty

Posted by Paul Dolman-Darrall on  Dec 20, 2012

Giving up certainty doesn't mean giving up predictability. This article examines 4 flow choices for software delivery and presents 3 choices for IT Delivery: Throughput, Flexibility & all out speed.

Interview and Book Review: Specification by Example

Posted by Shane Hastie on  Oct 24, 2011

Gojko Adzic has written Specification by Example in which he provides advice and guidelines on adopting this approach as a way to create living documentation on a software development project. 7

Agile Strategy Manifesto

Posted by Yogesh Kumar on  Aug 04, 2011

In this article, Yogesh Kumar explains how to apply Agile techniques to create and maintain healthy business strategies. This approach can turn good business strategies into great ones. 7

Agile Finance: Story Point Cost

Posted by Christopher Goldsbury on  Aug 18, 2010

This article ties a rather abstract and developer centered concept (story points) to the real world of business (spreadsheets and ledgers). Making this connection is essential for management. 5

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