BT

InfoQ Homepage Interpersonal Communication Content on InfoQ

  • Introversion, Ambiversion and Extroversion at Work

    Introversion and extroversion are not binary personality types; people fall somewhere on the scale between the two types and the way someone behaves can change depending on the context they find themselves in at the moment. In fact, most of the population are ambiverts. Understanding these differences can make for more effective teamwork and communication.

  • QCon New York – Optimizing Yourself Track

    Day 3 of QCon New York had a track focused on how individuals can build non-technical competencies. Titled Optimizing Yourself, the track had five talks covering a wide range of personal skills from empathy to communication, remaining relevant as an older person in tech, deep listening and working remotely.

  • Courage to Become Agile

    Being brave is about doing what is necessary, even when you are afraid. The single most important thing in agile is to inspect and dare to change things which aren't working. You can start with small experiments to find solutions, and if it turns they do not work, then you can stop them.

  • Q&A with Gerald Weinberg on The Influence of Individual Moods on Team Working

    InfoQ is researching the factors that influence the mood of teams. As team mood is an aggregation of the individual moods of team members, understanding the individual mood and how it influences team working can help to learn more about team moods. InfoQ interviewed Gerald Weinberg about individual and team mood, influencing the mood of individuals and discussing moods in teams.

  • DevOps Days Amsterdam Day 1 Focused on Continuous Delivery and DevOps Culture

    The first day of DevOps Days Amsterdam had its focus split between continuous delivery and promoting a DevOps culture. Talks focused on how to automate the deployment pipeline but also system recovery in case of failure. On the culture side leveraging distinct personality types to successfully introduce changes and the positive impact of strong company culture on hiring were some of the takeaways.

  • Interview: Linda Rising: Prejudices Can Alter Team Work

    In this interview filmed during Agile 2008, following the presentation "Who Do You Trust?", Linda Rising shows how prejudices can affect the relationships between team members. According to Linda, we all have a tendency to categorize others based on characteristics like race, religion, sex, but also based on more trivial characteristics, and many times we are not even aware we are doing it.

  • Agility Means Truthfulness

    Talk about agile can often tend toward the tangible things that people do day-to-day, toward the "process of agile", but true agility is really less about process and more about principle. Travis Birch presents his perspective about some of these more intangible aspects of agile, namely "truthfulness".

  • Article: "Who Do You Trust?" by Linda Rising

    During Agile 2008, Dr. Linda Rising held a presentation centered on experiments conducted many years ago, presenting how deep, powerfully affecting, and difficult to avoid are human “prejudices” and “stereotypes” as seen from the perspective of psychology and cognitive science. The article, written by Tsutomu Yasui, is a summary of that presentation.

  • Renowned Orchestra Embraces Scrum-like Practices

    A Scrum team has no designated leader; the team is expected to self-organize. Similarly, one of the world's most renowned orchestras has dispensed entirely with the role of conductor in favor of a process where leadership is shared and decisions are made by the team. Along the way, they have learned lessons and ways of working together that any Scrum team can benefit from.

  • How to Evaluate a Good Fit for XP?

    XP might not be for everyone. An interesting discussion on the Extreme Programming group, tries to find the factors, on which, an individual should be evaluated, to determine, whether he is fit to be on an XP team.

  • Truthfulness - an Agile Value?

    Declan Whelan wrote a thought-provoking blog citing an idea he learned from Mishkin Berteig about an (unspoken) principle behind successful Agile teams: truthfulness. The idea is simple: without individuals being honest and open, most agile practices will not work.

  • Voting Someone Off the Island on an Agile Team

    On Agile teams there is a definite possibility of having a team member who is not a good fit. Members of the Agile community discuss the reasons and possible ways of voting someone off the island.

  • Interview with Joseph Pelrine: Agile Works. But HOW?

    Joseph Pelrine has come full circle: from university studies in Psychology, journeying through SmallTalk, XP and Scrum, and now back to broader questions: Why and how does Agile work? In this interview, Joseph talked about Complexity Science, and how story-telling, "sense-making," network analysis and speed-dating's gut-feel approach may prove more useful than our old toolkits for managing teams.

  • Managers: Help your Teams Learn Communication Skills

    The Agile “self organising team” paradigm requires that team members develop strong interpersonal skills. Now management gains an important role in helping teams learn new ways to communicate and collaborate. This article proposes some strategies for imparting new skills without crushing a team’s growing self-organization, and suggests some sources of helpful material for developing new skills.

  • InfoQ Video: Practices of an Agile Developer

    At NFJS Venkat Subramaniam, co-author with Andy Hunt of "Practices of an Agile Developer," shared his pragmatic approach to some of the important technical and non-technical factors contributing to project success, including: coding, developer attitude, debugging, mentoring and feedback.

BT

Is your profile up-to-date? Please take a moment to review and update.

Note: If updating/changing your email, a validation request will be sent

Company name:
Company role:
Company size:
Country/Zone:
State/Province/Region:
You will be sent an email to validate the new email address. This pop-up will close itself in a few moments.