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InfoQ Homepage Presentations Adopting Apache Cassandra

Adopting Apache Cassandra

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Bio

Eben Hewitt is Director of Application Architecture at Choice Hotels International. Hewitt has spoken to thousands of developers around the world on SOA, REST, and general architecture topics, has several certifications in Java and TOGAF. He is the author of “Cassandra: The Definitive Guide” and “Java SOA Cookbook” and a contributor to 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know.

About the conference

Strange Loop is a developer-run software conference. Innovation, creativity, and the future happen in the magical nexus "between" established areas. Strange Loop eagerly promotes a mix of languages and technologies in this nexus, bringing together the worlds of bleeding edge technology, enterprise systems, and academic research. Of particular interest are new directions in data storage, alternative languages, concurrent and distributed systems, front-end web, semantic web, and mobile apps.

Recorded at:

Dec 01, 2010

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Community comments

  • Good overview but some contrast/comparison with MongoDB would be useful

    by Faisal Waris /

    Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

    I just started dabbling with MongoDB for some data mining applications.

    My sense is that MongoDB is the most widely used no-sql db today and so some comparison to it would be useful.

    On the face of it, Mongo offers some features that are missing in Cassandra today:

    - adhoc query capability using a javascript type language
    - ability to run server side script functions
    - auto sharding (mongo shards and balances the distribution, automatically)
    - map-reduce with server side scripts

    It seems that Cassandra is better at handling a large volume of writes but requires programming to perform queries and data processing.

    Mongo has some notion of 'client tunable' consistency but I am still grapling with that.

    For data mining (where you load data less fequently and do many queries) would Mongo be a better choice? If large volume of writes are required then Cassandra should be favored?

  • Re: Good overview but some contrast/comparison with MongoDB would be useful

    by Alex Miller /

    Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

    FYI, there were a couple more nosql-related talks recorded at Strange Loop that will available here on InfoQ in the coming months:


    • Week of Dec 20th - "NoSQL at Twitter" - Kevin Weil (Twitter)

    • Week of Jan 17th - "Enterprise NoSQL: Silver Bullet or Poison Pill?" - Billy Newport (IBM)

    • Week of Feb 14th - a panel discussion about non-relational stores

    • Week of Feb 28th - "Scaling MongoDB" by Roger Bodamer of 10gen

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