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InfoQ Homepage Presentations Seriously, Use Groovy Now

Seriously, Use Groovy Now

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Bio

Ken Kousen is a software trainer and developer, NFJS speaker, and author of Making Java Groovy.

About the conference

This is a one-of-a-kind conference for application developers, solution and data architects: people who develop business applications, create multi-device aware web applications, process vast quantities of enterprise data, design cloud architectures, and manage high performance infrastructure. The sessions are specifically tailored for Developers and Architects using the popular open source Spring IO Projects, Groovy & Grails, Cloud Foundry, RabbitMQ, Redis, Geode, Hadoop and Tomcat technologies. Whether you're building mission-critical web or business applications, crunching huge amounts of distributed data, or designing the next killer cloud native application, SpringOne2GX will keep you up to date with the latest enterprise technology.

Recorded at:

Jan 15, 2016

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Community comments

  • Looks like Python me.

    by Tim Williams /

    • Re: Looks like Python me.

      by Tim Williams /

    • Re: Looks like Python me.

      by Manoranjan Magudamudi /

      • Looks like Python me.

        by Tim Williams /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        Why not put your corporate resources behind developing a proper typed functional language with good java interop? It doesn't have to be verbose (like Groovy++), or use curly braces, or even nominally typed. Can we please have some innovation. At least Scala has some new ideas, even if you don't like the end result.

      • Re: Looks like Python me.

        by Tim Williams /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        Apologies, this rant was directed at all the various financial backers of Groovy, not at the Speaker of this talk.

      • Re: Looks like Python me.

        by Manoranjan Magudamudi /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        I am not a Groovy dev but considering the time (2003) Groovy was introduced, it was certainly a good innovation. I think Groovy has its place in the JVM ecosystem and is a good platform for certain problems (hint: Gradle/Grails/Spock) with its excellent Java interop. It solves a different problem in the JVM ecosystem than a typed functional language.

        We have good typed languages (with more functional concepts) in JVM like Scala (Typesafe), Frege and Kotlin (Jetbrains). Kotlin in particular has excellent Java interop.

      • Re: Looks like Python to me.

        by Tim Williams /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        Oh come on. We both know it was not an innovation even in 2003. Where is the journal paper? Kawa scheme and others proved one could implement alternative languages on the JVM not long after Java's release. Nick Benton had ML running on the JVM in 1998 (Google the paper). Groovy just adds curly braces and bizarre design choices. I would like to better understand what problem you think it is solving, other than Java itself? Frege looks interesting, but it's very early stages and has no commercial support. I'm not convinced lazy evaluation is the best default for the JVM either. Right I'm off to take my medication....

      • Re: Looks like Python to me.

        by Manoranjan Magudamudi /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        Yeah agree with your points. When I said innovative, I meant the superb interop with Java. I dont remember any language with that level of interop with Java (a close second will be Kotlin now). When I tried Groovy a couple of years back, in a small existing Java 6 project, the change to the existing Java files were as simple as renaming .java to .groovy and everything was working fine. So Groovy felt like a superset of Java.

        However I ran into lot of bugs in the language and I left Groovy for good. A couple of bugs I remember are: Some metaprogramming features did not work on classes inherited from interfaces and private fields were accessible as if they were public fields. There were a few more I ran into, but I cannot recollect.

        Regarding what problem it solves: It makes good DSLs. Gradle is one good example and spock is another. Its not ground breaking but I think Gradle would not be so popular if not for the DSL. After working with Gradle, its hard to go back to maven.

      • Re: Looks like Python to me.

        by Tim Williams /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        Good point about DSLs

      • Thank you

        by chuang johnson /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        Very clear and precise introduction talk, thank you Ken!

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