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InfoQ Homepage Presentations REST: A Pragmatic Introduction to the Web's Architecture

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REST: A Pragmatic Introduction to the Web's Architecture

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Bio

Stefan Tilkov is co-founder and principal consultant of innoQ, lead SOA editor at InfoQ, and a long time advocate of using RESTful HTTP to reach the high-level goals of SOA.

About the conference

QCon is a conference that is organized by the community, for the community.The result is a high quality conference experience where a tremendous amount of attention and investment has gone into having the best content on the most important topics presented by the leaders in our community. QCon is designed with the technical depth and enterprise focus of interest to technical team leads, architects, and project managers.

Recorded at:

Jan 29, 2009

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Community comments

  • Well-balanced introduction to REST

    by Raj Bhandari /

    • Re: Well-balanced introduction to REST

      by Jean-Jacques Dubray /

      • Well-balanced introduction to REST

        by Raj Bhandari /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        This is probably the first comparison of REST Vs SOA, WS.*, SOAP that explains how they can be compared.

      • Re: Well-balanced introduction to REST

        by Jean-Jacques Dubray /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        It would be interesting to get Stefan's opinion of Ross Altman's latest presentation. Ross is one of Sun's CTOs (for Business Integration) and he explains:

        Assumption: RESTful Web services should be used instead of WS-* Web services

        A case can be made for the use of RESTful services for Opportunistic applications. However, for Systematic applications, the Qualities of Service that are required would have to be built on an ad hoc basis.

        As a result, the cost of RESTful services would go up and interoperability would go down
        If the counterparties building a RESTful interaction have to “reinvent the wheel” of runtime governance standards, the costs and complexity of RESTful Web services would increase dramatically, undermining the attractiveness of the REST model

        Since the runtime management capabilities for each RESTful Systematic application would be developed in a non-standard way, interoperability between RESTful implementations would drop drastically

        When do you think we can throw darts at REST-*?

      • Re: Well-balanced introduction to REST

        by Stefan Tilkov /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        As you're asking for my opinion: No, I don't believe that WS-* will have to be re-invented for RESTful HTTP. For example, I believe that there are many, many more opportunities for runtime governance of RESTful HTTP services already, as the infrastructure has much more visibility into the messages flowing through it.

      • Re: Well-balanced introduction to REST

        by Jean-Jacques Dubray /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        Hum... so if we take the elements of Runtime Governance for instance:

        - registry / repository
        - policies
        - security
        - change management
        - event management (as in Incident / Problem resolution)

        Could you explain how these pieces work in REST since there are no contracts, no boundaries, no policies, no agreed upon versioning capability, URIs are bolted on resource access operations (making it hard to deal with Change) and finally, how do you go about conducting a root cause analysis across a domain that has no autonomous boundaries (i.e. where the only explicit boundary is the network authority that owns a particular URI).

        When you build a Web App, you can monitor if it's up or down, and how it is behaving. When you cover a network authority with a series of "resources" where do you start when an event/incident/problem occurs? You go straight back to the design doc? you have no impact analysis capabilities?

      • Re: Well-balanced introduction to REST

        by Stefan Tilkov /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        Sorry for noting your comment so late.

        1) Are you suggesting there are widespread runtime governance standards for WS-*? Like what? UDDI? Currently, every governance product uses its own proprietary approach.

        2) You are free to use XML Schema, as much as you want to, when using RESTful. If you want to base part of your governance on the evolution of schemas, nothing stops you.

        3) There is no versioning support in WS-* that I'm aware of. The stuff I've read about it (including yours) talks about options for XML Schema versioning, which IMO a) still sucks b) is available for REST/HTTP if you disagree

        4) While I've seen tons of articles and presentations discussing the use of policies for governance, I've never seen it applied in practice.

        5) The impact analysis support I've seen in governance product requires additional metadata that has to be explicitly added, such as usage relationships between consumers and providers. This seems to be entirely orthogonal to the REST vs. WS-* discussion in my view.

        6) I fail to see how URIs make it hard to deal with change - in fact I disagree strongly. They offer a workable means to support old, new and unknown clients that I've not seen in the WS-* world.

        7) How are incident management and REST/WS-* related?

      • Data size and complexity

        by Rafiq Ahmed /

        Your message is awaiting moderation. Thank you for participating in the discussion.

        As methods like POST, GET has data size constrain, number of byte you can send. How can we send large data?

        Or better I want to know,if we building system with lot and lot of complex data. Is REST is good choice ? Possibly we can do it in REST.Amount of effort we put for development and maintaining the application will be huge as compare to using WS based on SOAP.

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