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InfoQ Homepage Quality Content on InfoQ

  • Understanding Quality and Reliability

    One of the most overlooked but important areas of software development is quality. It often is not considered or even discussed during the early planning stages of all development projects, but it’s almost always the ultimate criteria for when a product is ready to ship or deploy. This article will explore how to measure quality and minimize the factors that negatively impact software reliability.

  • The Way to No-Hotfix Deployment

    Hot-fix redeployment is a waste of time and effort at best, and often a source of further regression, Adam discusses some ready-to-use techniques that helped he and his team reduce the frequency of hot-fix deployments to almost zero.

  • Agile Approaches in Test Planning

    At Agile Testing Days 2015, Eddy Bruin and Ray Oei explained how to satisfy the needs of stakeholders who ask for test cases, test plans, and other comprehensive test artifacts without writing large test plans. An interview about test plans in agile, how to make stakeholders aware that they can influence quality, and which agile practices they recommend for testing.

  • Faster, Smarter DevOps

    Moving your release cadence from months to weeks is not just about learning Agile practices and getting some automation tools. It involves people, tooling and a transition plan. Derek Weeks discusses some of the benefits and approaches to getting there.

  • Q&A on The Agile Mind-Set

    Gil Broza explores agile values, beliefs and principles, and explains how they can be used to drive agile adoption in his book The Agile Mind-set. The book provides ideas, examples, and anecdotes that organizations can use to make a shift to agile.

  • Toward Agile Architecture: Insights from 15 Years of ATAM Data

    The authors have concluded after analyzing 15 years of Architecture Trade-Off Analysis Method (ATAM) data across 31 projects that modifiability, performance, availability, interoperability, and deployability are key quality attributes for Agile practitioners.

  • The Most Common Reasons Why Software Projects Fail

    Knowing the basics of software development can greatly improve the project outcome; however, that alone is not enough to prevent project failures. Projects can be categorized as failures because of cost overruns, late deliveries or poor quality, but the right estimation processes can increase the likelihood of project success.

  • Q&A on Fifty Quick Ideas to Improve Your Tests

    An interview with Gojko Adzic, David Evans and Tom Roden on why they wrote this book, how quantifying quality can support testing, balancing trust levels when testing large and complex systems, why automating manual tests is almost always a bad idea, on using production metrics in testing, how to reduce or prevent duplication in test code, and on upcoming books in the fifty quick ideas series.

  • Q&A on Test Driven Development and Code Smells with James Grenning

    InfoQ interviewed James Grenning about why people are not doing technical practices sufficiently or well enough, why he thinks that TDD can be fun, the importance of unit tests, why programmers need to have a good nose for code smells and how they can become better in discovering "bad code”.

  • Coding Culture: How To Build Better Products by Building Stronger Teams

    Software developers spend a tremendous amount of time and energy focused on how to build the best possible products. We obsess over what web framework to use or whether to go with a NoSQL or SQL database. While these questions are important, they often neglect to address an equally important aspect of software development: culture.

  • Refactoring Coderetreats: In Search of Simple Design

    In cities all over the world, groups of software developers have been getting together at weekends repeatedly trying to write code for a given problem, but never completing a solution. At coderetreats, developers learn from each other and refine their software design skills. In this article David examines how they work? What do people say about them? How to make them even better?

  • Evo: The Agile Value Delivery Process, Where ‘Done’ Means Real Value Delivered; Not Code

    Current agile practices are far too narrowly focused on delivering code to users and customers. There is no systems-wide view of other stakeholders, of databases, and anything else except the code. This article describes what ‘Evo’ is at core, and how it is different from other Agile practices, and why ‘done’ should mean ‘value delivered to stakeholders’.

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