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Which Kanban Practices Can Deliver Value When Used next to Mainstream Agile Method?

| by Ben Linders Follow 28 Followers on Aug 28, 2015 |

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Many organizations that are using XP and/or Scrum for agile software development are also  now starting to adopt kanban practices in their daily work or migrating to kanban as their main approach for agile. 

This research question investigates which kanban practices are considered to deliver additional value when used next to agile practices from mainstream agile methods such as Scrum or XP. 

What do you think are the  kanban practices that can deliver value?

The options 

  • Classes of service: Indicating the priority and speed for the work to be done.
  • Reducing WIP: Limiting the number of things that are being worked on in parallel. 
  • Entry and exit criteria: To be checked before work is started and to make sure that it is fully done.
  • Spontaneous improvement: People gathering ad hoc to discuss issues and decide on improvement actions.
  • Due dates for items: Date on which work needs to be done.
  • Expedite lane: Mechanism to prioritize specific work over ongoing work to have it finished as quickly as possible.
  • Measuring throughput: Measure the number of work units that have been processed per time unit for increasing productivity and delivering value.
  • Electronic Kanban boards: Boards that are available on line to help (distributed) teams to plan and track work. 
  • Blockers: Dealing with issues that are preventing a team from making progress.
  • Tracking blockers time: Measuring the lead time of blocking issues for analysis and adressing root causes.
  • Smaller, similar sized work items (#noestimates): Reducing the need for estimation of work items.
  • Kanban Kata: Small exercise that can be done to learn and internalize a kanban practice.
  • Cycle time vs lead time: Time that a team spends working on a work item. vs. time from when a work item is placed on the board until it is completed.
  • Cumulative Flow Diagram: Visualizing the quantity of work in different states and providing insight into the lead time.

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Smaller, similar-sized work items is not a Kanban practice by Steve McGee

One of Kanban's benefits, and a differentiator from Lean, is the acceptance of variation. The measurement processes mitigate planning problems with variation. This is a very misunderstood concept at least in North America.

Re: Smaller, similar-sized work items is not a Kanban practice by Ben Linders

Thanks Steve for your addition.

Re: Kanban Practices by alicia worthington

I will go with :

Measuring throughput: Measure the number of work units that have been processed per time unit for increasing productivity and delivering value. I think its very important part we have used it our content transfer app Project. The word increasing productivity does matter.

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