BT

InfoQ Homepage User Stories Content on InfoQ

Articles

RSS Feed
  • Scaling Agile - Slice and Understand Together

    This second article in the series about making scaled agile work digs into how to slice requirements. If this is done right, it will not only result in good slices, but also a common understanding of the product we’re about to build or enhance.

  • User Stories Are Placeholders for Requirements

    It can be difficult to change from a Waterfall approach where ‘business analysts write big requirements up front’ to the Agile practice in which requirements are prepared ‘just in time’, and are the responsibility of the entire team. The secret to success in Agile is ruthless management of scope.

  • Q&A with the Authors on "Requirements: The Masterclass LiveLessons-Traditional, Agile, Outsourcing"

    Suzanne and James Robertson, authors of numerous publications in the requirements field, launched a video course called "Requirements: The Masterclass LiveLessons-Traditional, Agile, Outsourcing". InfoQ interviewed them on these video lessons to get further insights into some of the topics addressed.

  • Probabilistic Project Planning Using Little’s Law

    When working on projects, it is most of the time necessary to forecast the project delivery time up front. Little’s Law can help any team that uses user stories for planning and tracking project execution no matter what development process it uses. We use a project buffer to manage the inherent uncertainty associated with planning and executing a fixed-bid project and protect its delivery date.

  • Q&A on the Book Scenario-Focused Engineering

    The book Scenario-Focused Engineering describes a customer-centric lean and agile approach for developing and delivering software-based products. It provides ideas to understand customer needs based upon end-to-end experiences and for designing products in a customer-focused way using a fast feedback cycle.

  • Probabilistic Project Sizing Using Randomized Branch Sampling (RBS)

    Analyzing all the stories in a project requires significant time. How can we estimate the size of a project without prior identification and analysis of every single user story? If you don't want to analyze all user stories in your project in order to estimate its size then Randomized Branch Sampling is an approach you can use for portfolio related decisions and quotations on prospect projects.

  • Q&A on Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly

    The book "Agile! The Good, the Hype and the Ugly" by Bertrand Meyer provides a review of agile principles, techniques and tools. It explores the agile methods Extreme Programming, Lean Software, Scrum and Crystal and provides suggestions on what to use or not to use from them, based on software engineering principles and research and personal experience of the book author.

  • How to Remain Agile When You Have to Sign a Contract?

    Agile development based on a contract that has been accepted by lawyers seems impossible. The nature of traditional purchasing and contracting processes does not match the Agile principles. This is a case story of how a supplier cooperated with a client to develop a huge project in an Agile way, by cutting it into smaller pieces and prepare a matching contract based on mutual trust.

  • Getting RID of Risk with Agile

    One of the largest areas of waste in development are poorly formed requirements. This post presents a very simple technique that can be applied to all user stories to improve quality and reduce waste, as well as examining how this can fit into your current planning and estimation workflow via the underused ‘definition of ready’. It’s a very actionable concept that you can apply immediately.

  • Q&A with Gojko Adzic on Fifty Quick Ideas to Improve Your User Stories

    The book fifty quick ideas to improve your user stories aims to help people to write better user stories, supporting teams in iteratively delivering products that satisfy the needs of their customers. InfoQ interviewed Gojko Adzic about the format of his new book, when and when not to use user stories, the ideas that the book provides, organizing product backlogs and prioritizing user stories.

  • Testing the Internet of Things: The Human Experience

    Mobile and embedded devices, more than any other technology, are an integral part of our lives and have the potential to become a part of us. This article discusses what “human experience” testing is and is not, and uses concepts from human computer interaction design theory to establish a framework for developing “human experience” test scenarios.

  • What UX is and isn't?

    User Experience is part of a collaborative, self-contained and balanced team that has all the necessary roles to be wholly responsible for building the right thing, and building the thing right.User experience runs deep, is way more than the UI, and starts in the abstract with the strategy.

BT

Is your profile up-to-date? Please take a moment to review and update.

Note: If updating/changing your email, a validation request will be sent

Company name:
Company role:
Company size:
Country/Zone:
State/Province/Region:
You will be sent an email to validate the new email address. This pop-up will close itself in a few moments.