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InfoQ Homepage Product Owner Content on InfoQ

  • Seven Key Insights of Product Management

    What a product manager does and how they do it seems like a perennial question, an ongoing discussion, often ending in debate. This changes depending on factors such as the size and culture of the company, the industry or sector, the business model, where the product is in its lifecycle, and the type of product. What doesn’t change is they’re always thinking about customer and business needs.

  • Software Systems Need Skin in the Game

    Consequential decisions need to be taken by the people who pay for the consequences, by the people with skin in the game, and modern software practices need to reinforce this idea. On-call engineering is the quintessential modern engineering practice to create skin in the software development game.

  • Who is on the Team?

    Ahmad Fahmy and Cesario Ramos take the changes to the new Scrum Guide as an opportunity to explore what it means to be "on a team." They draw on research to create an ACID test to differentiate who is on the team and who isn't. They discuss different mental models around the idea of a team with the hopes that you take this opportunity to discuss and elevate the roles within your organization.

  • The Complexity of Product Management and Product Ownership

    Doug Talbot discusses the confusion surrounding Product Ownership / Product Management. He provides some advice on tackling the complexity of creating your own contextualised and personalised product value stream for your organisation or team and using systems thinking and Cynefin for complexity.

  • Q&A on the Book How to Lead in Product Management

    The book How to Lead in Product Management by Roman Pichler provides solutions for product managers and product owners to lead development teams and stakeholders. It covers practices like building trust, setting product goals, listening and speaking, resolving conflict, and securing buy-in to product decisions in order to achieve product success.

  • Product Goals, not Sprint Goals

    There is a myth that Sprint Goals are a way to focus Scrum teams towards a common purpose, and without Sprint Goals, teams would end up building a disparate list of Product Backlog Items, every Sprint. This is in fact not only untrue, the reality is the exact opposite, that Sprint Goals are in fact a distraction and would only deliver parts of Product Goals.

  • Author Q&A on the Book Business Analysis Agility

    James and Suzanne Robertson have written a book titled Business Analysis Agility - Solve the Real Problem, Deliver Real Value. They address the fact that despite the adoption of agile approaches a lot of time, effort and money is wasted building the wrong product. They explore the challenges faced undertaking analysis in agile environments and address some of the common mistakes.

  • Author Q&A on the Book Product Takeoff

    In their book Product Liftoff Kamal and Nav explore through examples, stories and practical exercises what it takes to bring a new product from concept to launch, and beyond. They provide tools and techniques that teams and individuals can use to help guide product development and ensure they are solving the right problem, building the right product which addresses real customer needs.

  • Q&A on the Book The Professional Product Owner

    The book The Professional Product Owner explains what Product Owners can do to become real entrepreneurs who initiate and drive products, and what teams can do to release frequently. It provides ideas and personal anecdotes for effectively applying the Scrum Product Owner role and activities.

  • Scaling Agile - Master Planning Together

    The first article in the series about making scaled agile work shared a true scaling agile story; the second article described the importance and the how-to’s of slicing your requirements into potential releasable epics. So now we’re ready to build on top of those slices and that common understanding; we’re ready to do the master planning together.

  • Book Q&A on Product Mastery

    The best product owners are insatiably curious about their customers; they observe them in action, interview them, and collaborate with them and bring them into the development process, said Geoff Watts. In his new book Product Mastery he explores what he calls “the difference between good and great product ownership”.

  • Product Owner Raison d'Etre in an Agile Team

    Companies may claim they're implementing Scrum, but is the claim really valid? Do they uphold the philosophy of Scrum? It turns out it's not, as a lot of companies are still practicing a distorted version of Scrum. Part of the common dysfunction is the misunderstood role of the product owner: a role essential to success with Scrum. What then is the actual job of a good product owner?

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