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InfoQ Homepage Culture Change Content on InfoQ

  • Discovering Culture through Artifacts: QCon London Q&A

    Behavior and values are two critical components to organizational culture; values denote what the organization believes in, and behaviors are rooted in those values, argued Mike McGarr, engineering leader at Slack. At QCon London 2019 he spoke about improving your understanding of an organization’s culture, the key components of culture, and what to look for in order to learn about the culture.

  • People Are More Complex Than Computers: Growing the Equal Experts' Team and Culture

    Earlier this week, in QConLondon 2019, Mairead O’Connor from Equal Experts presented on the topic “People are more complex than computers”. In this talk, O'Connor presented on the way that Equal Experts managed to grow into a network of 1,500 people, with over 800 of them being consultants and the organisational and cultural challenges that come with creating this unique organisational structure.

  • Katherine Kirk on Dealing with Teamwork Hell

    Dysfunction in teams can truly feel like being in hell, confined within an endless loop of unhappiness, and there are ways to approach the challenges through actively managing your own response to stressful situations, maintain your own integrity and ethical standards and diligently take small steps rather than trying to address every aspect of the situation at one time.

  • Bringing the Humanity Back into Customer Support

    Treat your support team well and they will treat your customers well. Support teams need to be trained and trusted, they deserve autonomy and ownership over their work. Bots shouldn’t be used in customer support to help people solve problems; people need to help people even if it’s more expensive than hiring robots.

  • Designing Organisations with Purposeful Agile

    In a purpose-centric agile implementation, stakeholders make a clear shared purpose come to reality through visible outcomes. It starts with awareness of the organisation’s installed culture, finding installed habits and beliefs that pull back and block change, and deciding what you want to do about that. The second step is to create the necessary time and space for true change to happen.

  • Perpetual Guardian Experiments with a Four Day Work Week

    Earlier this year, Perpetual Guardian, a New Zealand company that manages trust, wills and estates, invited its two hundred and forty employees to join an eight-week experiment during which they would work four days a week and enjoy an extra leisure day, although getting the same amount of money.

  • Focusing on Business Outcomes at Barclays: Overcoming the "Urgency Paradox"

    Jonathan Smart, head of working ways, and Morag McCall, PMO at Barclays, spoke last month at the DevOps Enterprise Summit in London about re-thinking the entire flow of work, from initial idea triage until releasing to production. This means introducing agility into how the application and services portfolio is managed, as well as changing the role of the PMO and finance departments.

  • Spark the Change: Building Tomorrow’s Company

    Tomorrow’s company has to invest in well being, should move away from individual silos to team delivery, needs to have psychological space and safety, and must be able to deal with uncertainty. To build such companies we can use gamification, pretotyping, IoT, artificial intelligence, robots, chatbots and other conversational interfaces. We should focus on teams and question how we work together.

  • Driving Innovation at Switzerland's Largest Bank

    Jelena Laketic, head of asset management SWAT (SoftWare Action Team) at UBS, spoke at the DevOps Enterprise Summit London about some of the lessons she has learned driving innovation at the largest bank in Switzerland. InfoQ reached out to Laketic in order to get her view on the particular challenges and successes around her SWAT journey and what innovation means at UBS.

  • Too Many Scripts Can Kill Your Continuous Delivery

    Avantika Mathur spoke at Continuous Lifecycle London last month on the costs associated with an ever increasing number of scripts in a Continuous Delivery pipeline. Besides the cost of maintaining the scripts, the lack of visibility and auditability on exactly what activities are being carried out before deploying a change to production is another major cost not many organizations are aware of.

  • Enabling Continuous Delivery with a Dedicated Team

    Robin Weston describes how an external enablement team was able to introduce continuous delivery practices in an organization with high resistance to change and siloed teams. Rather than just bringing in new technology and tools, the team focused on sharing and educating teams. Practices ranged from continuous integration, to following the test pyramid, or reducing cycle time by identifying waste.

  • Happy Cultures and How They Grow High Performers

    ITV's Tom Clark spoke at DOXLON in February, proposing the hypothesis that high performance is a side-effect of creating happy teams. Andy Flemming, contributor to Deliberately Developmental Organization, also recently spoke about how to reap business and strategic benefits by creating a culture with an intentional focus on transparency, and the learning, growth and happiness of individuals.

  • Great Engineering Cultures and Organizations - Afternoon Sessions from QCon London

    The Building Great Engineering Cultures and Organizations track at QCon London 2018 contained talks from practitioners representing digital leaders of the consumer internet as well as transformational corporates from “traditional” sectors. Previously InfoQ published a summary of the morning sessions; this is the summary of the afternoon sessions of this track.

  • Using Agile Principles with Scrum Studio to Increase Organizational Responsiveness

    Using a change approach based on agile principles with Scrum Studio helped a Dutch pension and investment management company to become more responsive at structurally lower costs. The change team practiced what they preached by applying transparent and iterative change with similar characteristics as the intended end result. They established a culture where people are taking responsibility.

  • Game Changing Beliefs for Knowledge Working Organizations

    Game changing beliefs carry the strength of the strongest walls to shape our behavior. The beliefs we choose to take on in our professional work are a leverage point. They can help us to change the culture and behavior in organizations to increase agility.

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