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  • Q&A on the Book Agile Management

    The book Agile Management by Mike Hoogveld explores how the agile principles and values can be implemented in an agile way to improve the flexibility and entrepreneurship within organizations. It shows how the “voice of the customer” should be the starting point for designing the products, services, channels and processes you offer to your customers.

  • Q&A on the Book Fit for Purpose

    The book Fit for Purpose by David Anderson and Alexei Zheglov explores how companies can understand their customers and develop products that fit with the purpose(s) their customers have. It provides a framework to help you understand customers’ purposes, segment your market according to purpose, and manage the portfolio of products and services to create happy customers.

  • Scaling Agile - Slice and Understand Together

    This second article in the series about making scaled agile work digs into how to slice requirements. If this is done right, it will not only result in good slices, but also a common understanding of the product we’re about to build or enhance.

  • Scaling Agile – a Real Story

    This is the first in a series of articles about making scaled Agile work with slicing, master planning, and big room planning. It is the true story from one particular program in a financial services company, the EU Mifid regulation of extended responsibility for investment advisors.

  • Using Structured Conversations to Discover Your MVP

    In an increasingly more complex world, finding the smallest possible chunk to deliver to get feedback is essential. This is the idea behind the term MVP. This article describes a model where business and technology together explore the product needs along seven product dimensions, which is a great way of finding small slices of work to develop.

  • Book Q&A on Product Mastery

    The best product owners are insatiably curious about their customers; they observe them in action, interview them, and collaborate with them and bring them into the development process, said Geoff Watts. In his new book Product Mastery he explores what he calls “the difference between good and great product ownership”.

  • Service Design: Consumer Journey Mapping

    A process of identifying key customer interactions with the product. This is a holistic approach to envisioning customer interactions at various touchpoints through service design tools to help organizations to understand, visualize and envision their new or existing customer there by aligning their products.

  • What Does "Being Digital" Actually Mean?

    Digital transformation is a key aim of many organisations these days, with varying levels of success. This is often due to a lack of understanding about what being digital really means. Being Digital is the re-imagining of business processes to be by default a fully online, fully automated process from end user interaction to back office processing, with no need for human intervention.

  • Interview with Wesley Coelho on Challenges in DevOps

    At the Agile 2016 Conference InfoQ spoke to Wesley Coelho, Senior Director of Business Development for Tasktop, about the communication challenges inherent in DevOps and how to overcome them; how DevOps and agile expose organisational silos and waterfall communications flows that need to become adaptive and automated.

  • Q&A with the Author on "Designing the Requirements”, an Alternative Approach

    In the book “Designing the Requirements: Building Applications that the User Wants and Needs”, the author Chris Britton proposes an alternative path that goes from understanding the requirements to deliver spot on solutions.

  • Standardizing Requirements Descriptions on Scrum Projects for Better Development and Testing Quality

    Standardizing requirements descriptions on Scrum projects benefit development and testing quality. Without standardizing, the project may suffer. Standardizing requirements descriptions provides a minimum of eight benefits from requirements descriptions unification, which in turn positively affects testing and makes management of ongoing changes in requirements easier with the help of tools.

  • WTF requirements in Agile Product Development

    The use of all-conclusive, hard-defined, non-negotiable BRDs is not appropriate in agile development. It will lead to an array of dysfunctions, including Local Optimization, deterioration of relationships between Product Owners and Feature Teams as well as loss of trust by end-customers. A refined, well-prioritized Product Backlog is the right place to store requirements in agile development.

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