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A Discussion On Grails in the Enterprise

| by Scott Delap Follow 0 Followers on Jan 12, 2007. Estimated reading time: 1 minute |
Groovy/Grails has continued to gain momentum in recent months. Grails co-founder Steven Devijver recently took a look at the Java web framework space and the case for Grails in the Enterprise. In summary Steven makes the following points: Companies have a large number of projects in Struts along with a large number of developers being available with Struts experience. This creates a market for Struts but doesn't mean it is the right framework for a project in 2007.
...the reason why companies are using Struts today is because they are conservative about the alternatives. Changing development standards costs money in training and the time it takes to become experienced with new tools...In other words, they can’t get a competitive advantage by switching to another Java web framework. In the companies I’ve visisted that are using Struts developers would be very happy to switch to Spring MVC. But their companies don’t because their developers are very efficient in building their web applications with Struts, it just works...

He then continues by suggesting that developers don't try to sell management on Grails but instead to sell them on Ajax and web services. Grails then becomes a logical option to use for such applications.

Comments on Steven's position seem mixed however. As one developer points out:

After playing around with Grails for a few weeks, my conclusion is that it is not ready for prime time yet. I say this not to be critical, but to warn you that if you keep beating the drum that enterprise users should switch from Struts or whatever else they are using to Grails, you will get what you ask for. And what I think will happen is many of those early adopters that try the switch will be frustrated due to the bug and changing feature they will run into...Also, I think one thing you are going to run up against is that Struts 2 solves many of the pain points of Struts. I would assume many enterprises would rather upgrade to a newer version of Struts than switch frameworks altogether...

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Check out JBoss Seam by Fucked Up

I am not sure whether SEAM has already entered into Enterprise or not but it's worth a checkout. I think Grails has a long learning curve if someone hasn't worked on Spring before. Grrovy won't be hard enough to learn for those who have some experience in scripting languages and as it's written like Java it won't be that hard.

Seam has JSF Ajax based components, Rails or Grails "code with convention" like strategy, scaffolding, MVC, DRY etc etc.

JdonFramework is in java by Peng Sunny

Jdon Framework is a lightweight enterprise application framework, it combines with DDD and Ioc/AOP POJOs ( Ruby on Rails is Domain Drive Development but not in java, Spring that is very agility so too complicated!) .

jdon.dev.java.net/

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