BT

QCon Schedule Posted: Europe has a New Major Software Conference

| by Floyd Marinescu Follow 35 Followers on Jan 11, 2007. Estimated reading time: 2 minutes | NOTICE: The next QCon is in San Francisco Nov 5 - 9, 2018. Join us!
The schedule for QCon London has been posted spanning 5 days with three full conference days and 2 tutorial days featuring speakers such as Martin Fowler, Dave Thomas, Gavin King, Werner Vogels, Rod Johnson, Erik Meijer, and 50 others. Tracks span Java, .NET, Ruby, SOA, Agile, Investment banking IT, Architecture, Usability, and case studies on eBay and other major software deployments.  There are still a few sessions to be finalized on the schedule but for the most part complete.

Keynotes have been finalized and include:
- ThoughtWork's Martin Fowler and Dan North
- Amazon.com CTO Werner Vogels on Amazon.com

- Microsoft's LINQ creator Eric Meijer

Conference tutorials have also been finalized and include:
 - Domain Specific Languages in Groovy, with Guilluame Laforge and John Wilson
 - Certified Scrum Master Class, with Jeff Sutherland
 - Hands-on Agile Development Workshop, with Kevlin Henney
 - Introduction to the EJB 3.0 Java Persistence API, EJB co-spec lead Mike Keith
 - Agile Leadership: Moving from Management that Controls to Management that Facilitates, Diana Larsen
 - Ajax-enable your Java application with DWR, Joe Walker
 - Usage-Centered Software Design: An Activity-Based Approach, Larry Constantine
 - What can JMX do for you? Simon Brown

Here is a quick snapshot of all the tracks and topics:

The tracks and topics have also been 90% defined, and are as follows:
 
Agile Foundations
Team building, Scrum@Google, User Stories & Release plans, Retrospectives
 
Agile Journey to Mastery Open Space
Open Space + sessions: Org. challenges, Quality management, Mock roles, Expertise
 
Ajax & Browser-Based Applications
Dojo, Prototype, Ajax Patterns, Google GWT, Flex
 
Architecture in context of quality attributes
Performance & Scalability, Modfiability, Availability, Security
 
Investment Banking Architectures
Real time, STP, Messaging, AMQP, SEPA, MiFID, Front office
 
Java in Action
Spring, TestNG, EJB 3, AOP, Eclipse/Swing RCP
 
Java Emerging Technologies
Seam, OSGi, JRuby, Grails, JVM Clustering

.Net Enterprise Development
WPF, ASP.NET, LINQ, WCF, Interop
 
SOA: Bridging business and technology
Adoption, Governance, Rest vs. SOAP, Service Composition, Case studies
 
Software Usability for software developers

Analysis, Architecture, Patterns, Best practices
 
What makes Ruby Roll?
Metaprogramming, DSLs, Rails plugins, Mongrel, Rails deployment

In addition, we are putting together a case studies track with presentations directly from the architects of eBay, InfoQ, Voca, Amazon, and more.

QCon is being organized jointly by InfoQ.com and JAOO: a prestigous 10 year-running enterprise software conference from Denmark. In the tradition of InfoQ.com and JAOO conferences, QCon is designed with the technical depth and enterprise focus of interest to technical team leads, architects, and project managers and will be similar to JAOO in it's commitment to quality content and a high quality attendee experience.  If you're excited about the UK or the world finally having a world-class conference like this, please support the conference by letting others know about it! Infact, bloggers can enter to win a free pass as part of Simon Brown's QCon blogging meme.

Visit qcon.infoq.com and also check out videos from JAOO on InfoQ, our sister conference.

Rate this Article

Adoption Stage
Style

Hello stranger!

You need to Register an InfoQ account or or login to post comments. But there's so much more behind being registered.

Get the most out of the InfoQ experience.

Tell us what you think

Allowed html: a,b,br,blockquote,i,li,pre,u,ul,p

Email me replies to any of my messages in this thread

Hm... by Joost de Vries

+/- 1700 euro for 3 days versus 200 euro for 3 days Javapolis.
That's a stupendous difference. I think that it's a pity that conferences by JAOO are that expensive.

Javapolis vs. QCon by Floyd Marinescu

+/- 1700 euro for 3 days versus 200 euro for 3 days Javapolis.
That's a stupendous difference. I think that it's a pity that conferences by JAOO are that expensive.
It's not quite a fair statement though. It's not that conferences by JAOO are expensive, as that price range is pretty standard for any conference that is *not* run as a non-profit by a user group. TSSJS (Europe and US), SD West and SD Best Practices, the Colorado Software Summit, pretty much any other conference with the size and profile of speakers as QCon, that are not being run by non-profit user groups are in that price range.

A more accurate statement is that conferences by non-profit user groups are less expensive. Along with a lower entrance price however are also less perks, such paper-bag sandwich lunches instead of sit-down warm meals, no parties with free alcohol, etc. These may not seem like big deals when judged before the event, but when you're at the event they do make a difference. JAOO is probably the most generous conference I've ever been to interms of how much they spend on the attendee experience, which is why InfoQ chose to partner with them to do QCon.

But probably the biggest reason why you can't compare Javapolis to QCon is the difference in topics and target audience. Javapolis is clearly a Java developer show. QCon is an enterprise software development show (not focused exclusively on Java) for technical team leads, architects and project managers, with tracks like quality attributes in architecture, investment banking architectures, usability, Agile, SOA, as well as more technical tracks on Java, .NET, Ajax & Browser architectures, and Ruby. Also a look at the people at the event also reflect it's more senior and diverse quality: Martin Fowler, Amazon CTO Werner Vogels, eBay fellow Dan Pritchett, Scrum co-founder Jeff Sutherland, LINQ inventor Erik Meijer, Patterns God James Coplien, Pragmatic Dave Thomas, a number of really senior architects and agilists, as well as developer stars such as Thomas Fuchs (scriptaculous creator) Gavin King, Alex Russell (Dojo), Rod Johnson, and many others.

So to conclude, compared to any other non-profit event, QCon/JAOO is probably the one of the best spare-no-expense conference experiences you could have in terms of quality, and compared to a non-profit java developer conference, well, it isn't trying to be a pure-developer or a pure-java conference. :)

Hope this clarifies things. And of course I am in now way putting down Javapolis. It's probably the best event of its type in the world, and we are supporters of it (see infoq.com/javapolis), I'm just clarifying that QCon and Javapolis are not the same 'type' of event.

Re: Javapolis vs. QCon by Dan Hardiker

A more accurate statement is that conferences by non-profit user groups are less expensive. Along with a lower entrance price however are also less perks, such paper-bag sandwich lunches instead of sit-down warm meals, no parties with free alcohol, etc.
I'm sorry but I must beg to differ! JavaPolis 2006 gave you a free backpack with a plethora of useful goodies inside (including a pad & pen - ever useful), a buffet of food available through out the day, free-as-in-beer literally at the booths (yes - 3x exhibition stands giving away beer!), a meet and greet with free beer vouchers for attendees, free wifi & internet cafe (technical issues aside), a free movie with chip vans outside!

To top it off the entire conference is held in 5 cinema rooms with video of the presenters and the slides projected to fill a massive cinema screen - you can read the code snippets and see the talker from the rafters. You couldn't ask for comfier seats - great for when the free beer from the previous night was causing your head to pulse a bit.

Don't forget that this is all for less than 15% of your typical conference entry fee - seriously - when was the last time you got all that at any conference - and what more do you want?


But probably the biggest reason why you can't compare Javapolis to QCon is the difference in topics and target audience. Javapolis is clearly a Java developer show. QCon is an enterprise software development show (not focused exclusively on Java) for technical team leads, architects and project managers, with tracks like quality attributes in architecture, investment banking architectures, usability, Agile, SOA, as well as more technical tracks on Java, .NET, Ajax & Browser architectures, and Ruby. Also a look at the people at the event also reflect it's more senior and diverse quality: Martin Fowler, Amazon CTO Werner Vogels, eBay fellow Dan Pritchett, Scrum co-founder Jeff Sutherland, LINQ inventor Erik Meijer, Patterns God James Coplien, Pragmatic Dave Thomas, a number of really senior architects and agilists, as well as developer stars such as Thomas Fuchs (scriptaculous creator) Gavin King, Alex Russell (Dojo), Rod Johnson, and many others.
Ok - yes JavaPolis is primarily orientated around the Java developer (and possibly the finest beer in the world), but to say that it has a lower quality of speakers or that it doesn't have any wider appeal is absurd. My boss has no Java experience, comes every year and thoroughly enjoys it - not to mention comes back with a better understanding of the world I develop in on a daily basis.

Every year around 20 Sun speakers are invited to talk, and there's a keynote by them too. Most of the talks are done by leaders in the field, and where API's are concerned it's typically done by a core committer. I've not found any other conference where the atmosphere is so relaxed, and the speakers & organisers are so approachable.

If you think QCon and Javapolis are really that different, watch the talks for yourself. Oh yeah - they're mostly available free too on www.parleys.com/

Re: Javapolis vs. QCon by Floyd Marinescu

Hi Dan, I did not in any way imply that Javapolis has lower quality speakers. My exact words were 'diverse quality', implying only that topics (and thus speakers) are more diverse than Java.

I did not say that JP doesn't have "any" wider appeal, I was commenting on the primary positioning of the conference and its content. JP appears to me to be primarily a Java developers show, and yes I'm sure that your project manager can also find cool stuff there. I was only saying that QCon is not primarily a developer show, it is primarily a team lead & architects show.

And yes both conferences are similar in that they have core committers, founders, and creators presenting. I did not imply the contrary.

JavaPolis 2006 gave you a free backpack with a plethora of useful goodies inside (including a pad & pen - ever useful), a buffet of food available through out the day, free-as-in-beer literally at the booths (yes - 3x exhibition stands giving away beer!), a meet and greet with free beer vouchers for attendees, free wifi & internet cafe (technical issues aside), a free movie with chip vans outside!
I guess things got better in 2006! Good for JP!

If you think QCon and Javapolis are really that different, watch the talks for yourself. Oh yeah - they're mostly available free too on www.parleys.com/
We are supporters of Javapolis, you can also watch some JP talks at infoq.com/javapolis

And yes we will be filming talks from QCon and putting them on InfoQ, just like we have from 10 other conferences.

thanks,

Floyd

Allowed html: a,b,br,blockquote,i,li,pre,u,ul,p

Email me replies to any of my messages in this thread

Allowed html: a,b,br,blockquote,i,li,pre,u,ul,p

Email me replies to any of my messages in this thread

4 Discuss

Login to InfoQ to interact with what matters most to you.


Recover your password...

Follow

Follow your favorite topics and editors

Quick overview of most important highlights in the industry and on the site.

Like

More signal, less noise

Build your own feed by choosing topics you want to read about and editors you want to hear from.

Notifications

Stay up-to-date

Set up your notifications and don't miss out on content that matters to you

BT