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Apple to Include Ruby on Rails With Next OS X Release

| by Peter Cooper Follow 0 Followers on Aug 08, 2006. Estimated reading time: 1 minute |

As the Ruby on Rails framework celebrates its second birthday, Apple has announced that Ruby on Rails is going to be included with both OS X Leopard Server and Client editions, due for release in early 2007. A demonstrative package has also been included with the developer preview build of Leopard given to developers today at Apple's developer's conference.

David Heinemeier Hansson, the creator of Ruby of Rails, hails this as a great acknowledgment from Apple, particularly as all of the core Rails development team is Apple based, along with a large share of Rails users. And in connection with Rails' second birthday, David presents his feelings on Ruby and Rails' growth over the past couple of years:

So for my (delayed) celebration of Rails turning two years old, I salute all early adopters who dared stick their neck out and be the subject of ridicule from their suspicious peers.

Let’s share a brief moment of guilty pleasure for proving them wrong, then move on to the longer lasting pleasure of simply sticking to it for our own sake. And have understanding for those conditioned by past disappointments to classify all that is new and ripe with passion to be uninteresting, to be all hype, no calories.

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What for? by Tomasz Blachowicz

What is the purpose to include RoR in OS? If you want to develop RoR-based application you can always download framework from the net and do it. It's really simple.

The only reason I could imagine is marketing:
- Look, OS X is so developer friendly, isn't it?
- Wow! Cool, lets buy some for our team!


But, do you think it isn't a bit... silly? We aren't youngsters, we are professionals. I hope.

Note: I'm not against Apple nor OS X. I wish I could affor one of this smart notebooks ;-)

Cheers,
Tom

Re: What for? by Alex Popescu

I may be wrong because I haven't used an Apple machine, but I heard that configuring everything needed to put RoR to work is not so trivial (and currently the recommended way to do it is published "somewhere" on the net).

./alex
--
.w( the_mindstorm )p.

Re: What for? by Tom Brice

I imagine for the same reason that they include Apache and PHP. Because there are people that want it, the OS is *nix based so it's easy to do...

Installing a bare-bones rails stack under any OS will take anywhere from 5-10 minutes to at least 30 minutes to grab the packages or compile if binaries are not available. On my MacBook Pro it probably took 45 minutes to get it all together and I have done it many times. For those that have never done it it will take longer.

Also if you read the post at weblog.rubyonrails.com/2006/8/7/ruby-on-rails-w... you will see that it will be part of the "Developer Tools" install under the client OS (ie not in the default install) and included in the server version.

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