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  • Keeping Technology Change Human

    When we are at the forefront of so much change, it's easy to forget that other people around us find change more challenging. This article is a reminder to look beyond the code and processes, to consider how tech team actions can affect our users in emotional ways. It seeks to establish a few ways of thinking to help bring others along with us when working through technology change.

  • Increasing Developer Effectiveness by Optimizing Feedback Loops

    We can think of engineering as a series of feedback loops: simple tasks that developers do and then validate to get feedback, which might be by a colleague, a system (i.e. an automation) or an end user. Using a framework of feedback loops we have a way of measuring and prioritizing the improvements we need to do to optimize developer effectiveness.

  • Put the Feedback back into “Demo & Feedback”

    As agilists, we know the importance of showing our work and getting feedback as early as we possibly can. That feedback guides what we do next. To get what you need to meet the desires of your stakeholders, this article looks at the demo and the feedback part of that session and provides suggestions for creating amazing demo & feedback sessions.

  • Becoming an Exceptional Manager

    The book Manager in Shorts by Gal Zellermayer describes principles of management in hi-tech, focusing on people, processes, and culture. It provides tips and ideas that readers can use to develop their leadership skills and learn how to manage technical people and become an exceptional manager.

  • Leading during Times of High Uncertainty and Change

    To help teams succeed during uncertain times, leaders need to navigate different horizons; managing themselves and building strong relationships with their teams. Organisations need leadership at all levels. In order to be successful, leaders should develop skills for self-management, delegation, dealing with ambiguity, managing in all directions, systems thinking, and leading through context.

  • Improving Organizational Agility with Self-Management

    This article presents "self-management" as a possibility to natively support agility to plant seeds and let both institutions and people thrive and benefit from it. Agility may go hand-in-hand with self-management as a way to shift mindsets and open a conversation to really find new ways of working in organizations.

  • Q&A on the Book The Rise of the Agile Leader

    The book The Rise of the Agile Leader by Chuck Mollor is a blueprint for leaders navigating change in the pursuit of success. Mollor shares his story of self-awareness, self-acceptance, and self-development, while demonstrating a leadership paradigm, a roadmap of what makes a great leader, and what organizations can do to develop great leaders.

  • Kick-off Your Transformation by Imagining It Had Failed

    Large scale change initiatives have a worryingly high failure rate, the chief reason for which is that serious risks are not identified early. One way to create the safety needed for everyone to speak openly about the risks they see is by running a pre-mortem. In a pre-mortem, we assume that the transformation had already failed and walk backward from there to investigate what led to the failure.

  • How to Build a Strong Beta Testers Community

    It is important to involve the real users at the early stages of your development cycle. A strong beta testers community not only improves your product, but also provides context, pain points and ideas while increasing loyalty and engagement. This article offers tips and tricks on how to build a beta testers program and a process of supporting the program with a modest allotment.

  • How to Mitigate the Pain of Getting and Giving Feedback

    Companies that encourage open and honest feedback do better than companies that do not. Nonetheless, giving feedback is difficult because social and physical pain share some of the same neural circuitry. Hence, feedback can feel physically painful, as Sarah Hagan discusses in her 2018 QCon San Francisco talk . Hagan uses scientific research to demonstrate how to give feedback properly.

  • Q&A on the Book Evidence-Based Management

    The book Evidence-Based Management by Eric Barends and Denise Rousseau explores how to acquire evidence, appraise the quality of the data, apply it in your management decisions, and assess the impact of your decisions.

  • Observability-Driven Development for Tackling the Great Unknown

    How does observability-driven development differ from monitoring? As our distributed systems become increasingly more complicated and as our silos break down for DevOps testing, automation, and efficiency, ODD arises as a superset of monitoring to understand your code’s unknown unknowns. Includes insights from Honeycomb Founder Charity Majors.

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