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InfoQ Homepage Project Management Content on InfoQ

  • Applying Software Delivery Metrics and Analytics to Recover a Problem Project

    Problem software delivery projects can be recovered mid-flight if Value Stream Management (VSM) analytics are used in a forensic way to uncover the root-cause of the issues. The root-cause metrics areas considered include: People Availability; Team Stress; Backlog Health; Sprint Accuracy; Process Efficiency; Story Management; and Defect Gen. A root-cause RAG reports shows key mitigations.

  • How to Decide in Self-Managed Projects - a Lean Approach to Governance

    Whether self-managed or self-governed as a project, the power still needs to be distributed internally. If the project is open to decide how things are done, how do we decide? A solid but flexible set of tools and practices like sociocracy is a great starting point for projects to have clear but lean processes that can grow as we grow.

  • Keeping Technology Change Human

    When we are at the forefront of so much change, it's easy to forget that other people around us find change more challenging. This article is a reminder to look beyond the code and processes, to consider how tech team actions can affect our users in emotional ways. It seeks to establish a few ways of thinking to help bring others along with us when working through technology change.

  • Applying the “Whole Product Model” to the “Technology Adoption Life Cycle”

    In order to develop products customer love, product managers need to truly understand how their “whole product” delivers value and when to address which customer segment. Two models that are very powerful when applied together, and that a product manager can use to develop extraordinary products, are The Whole Product Model and The Technology Adoption Life Cycle.

  • Increasing Developer Effectiveness by Optimizing Feedback Loops

    We can think of engineering as a series of feedback loops: simple tasks that developers do and then validate to get feedback, which might be by a colleague, a system (i.e. an automation) or an end user. Using a framework of feedback loops we have a way of measuring and prioritizing the improvements we need to do to optimize developer effectiveness.

  • The Flow System: Getting Fast Customer Feedback and Managing Flow

    The Flow System elevates Lean Thinking in an age of complexity by combining complexity thinking, distributed leadership, and team science into the Triple Helix of Flow, which organizations can use to become more innovative, adaptive, and resilient. This first article explores the importance of quality, getting fast feedback from customers, the concept of flow, and The Flow System.

  • Put the Feedback back into “Demo & Feedback”

    As agilists, we know the importance of showing our work and getting feedback as early as we possibly can. That feedback guides what we do next. To get what you need to meet the desires of your stakeholders, this article looks at the demo and the feedback part of that session and provides suggestions for creating amazing demo & feedback sessions.

  • Key Sprint Metrics to Increase Team Dependability

    What are the questions you should be asking and what behaviours should you be measuring within your Scrum teams in order to improve overall dependability and delivery efficiency? We explore how you can transform your Sprints into the building blocks for success and ensure you can continue to meet (and even surpass) long-term user and business expectations.

  • Only the Agile Survive in Today’s Ever-Changing Business Environment

    Today's business environments are changing more rapidly than ever before, with major shifts impacting all departments. Ongoing success requires the agility to quickly capitalize on opportunities, using technology to evolve and stay ahead of the game in employee retention, customer satisfaction, governance and compliance. Indeed, your ability to act swiftly can truly make or break your company.

  • Exchange Cybernetics: towards a Science of Agility & Adaptation

    Agility can become part of a scientific theory of adaptation. The capacity for adaptation is nothing more than the ability to move resources around in order to take opportunities as they emerge. This article describes the ingredients of an agile theory of adaptation and provides examples for how to do tactical planning in order to execute agility.

  • Q&A on the Book Further, Faster

    Businesses that thrive over the long term can focus on just a few things that truly matter to their teams and core customers. The book Further, Faster by Bill Flynn provides ideas for business leaders to build teams, create a strategy to stay close to customers, and manage a company’s growth with cash as the primary metric.

  • Agile Initiative Planning with Roadmaps

    Most “agile” initiatives fail to meet their value, time and budget goals despite spending ½ their time and 1⁄3 of their budget designing and planning upfront. Agile Initiative Roadmaps add product, project, architecture and UX planning to initiatives so that you can take a longer view with a small amount of time and effort, which means that you can deliver benefits much sooner at a lower cost.

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