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Applying Supply Chain Management to Deliver Faster with Higher Quality

by Ben Linders on  Jun 30, 2016 1

Supply chain management can raise the bar with continuous development, argues Joshua Corman, Director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative and co-founder of Rugged Software. Our dependence on IT and software is growing faster than our ability to secure it, and applying supply chain approaches to software development helps to address complexity which reduces risks and increases quality.

Shane Hastie on Applying the Agile Mindset to Tough Business Challenges at Agile Tour Singapore

by Savita Pahuja on  Feb 12, 2016

Shane Hastie gave a keynote talk at Agile Tour Singapore Conference 2015 in which he discussed Agile mindset and how it can be helpful in solving tough business problems.

Moving Fast at Scale

by Ben Linders on  Dec 08, 2015

Jez Humble talked about organizational obstacles to moving fast at scale and how to address them at the GOTO Berlin 2015 conference. InfoQ interviewed him about how we can focus on value, why having a shared understanding of an artifact can be very valuable, removing waste and discovering the needs of customers quickly with low costs, and how to use the concept of improvement kata.

Documentation in Agile: How Much and When to Write It?

by Ben Linders on  Jan 23, 2014 3

The Manifesto for Agile Software Development values "working software over comprehensive documentation". This core value asks us to think about how much and which kinds of documents are needed and when they need to be written.

Reduce Waste by Changing from Waterfall to Agile

by Ben Linders on  Sep 19, 2013 4

Organizations adopt agile to be able to handle changes. Agile helps teams to deliver products that satisfy the needs of customers; products which do not contain unneeded (and unused) features. Lean software development says: everything not adding value to the customer is considered to be waste. How can a transition from waterfall to agile software development help organizations to reduce waste?

Remove Waste From Your Backlog with the Priority Game

by Ben Linders on  Jun 24, 2013

The priority game is an exercise which Michael Franken did at the GOTO Amsterdam 2013 conference, to make large backlogs manageable. He showed how Scrum can help you to focus and remove waste by not making things that are probably never used by customers.

How can Agile make you Faster?

by Ben Linders on  Mar 07, 2013 4

Delivering faster is one of the reasons that enterprises mention why want to use agile for software development. How can agile be used to become faster?

Individual Yield

by Christopher Goldsbury on  Dec 28, 2011

Tony Wong, a project management blackbelt, enumerates some practical points on individual procutivity. This article wonders how well these apply to software development and contrasts his list with that of other lists.

Get Back To Work!

by Dan Puckett on  Nov 29, 2010 5

Hitting a kanban limit introduces slack into an organization by temporarily stopping the work that feeds into a bottleneck. So how can you convince management that introducing a kanban limit (i.e. stopping work) could actually be a good thing?

JRebel 3.0 Release - Hotswap Reloaded

by Michael Hunger on  Apr 20, 2010 1

JRebel 3.0 was released on April 16th. It targets turnaround time in Java development by removing the need for redeployment. Instead it supports advanced class reloading. The article details updating Java classes at runtime and provides an overview of the technologies used in JRebel and especially the improvements of the recently version 3.0.

Experiment Driven Development - The Post-Agile Way

by Sebastien Auvray on  Feb 25, 2010 6

TDD and BDD are now widely-used software development techniques. However, solely following TDD & BDD may still lead to missed business opportunities, or worse, a negative impact to the business. Two questions which TDD & BDD are unable to answer are: How do you measure the usage of your application? How do you get feedback from your customers? Is Experiment-Driven Development (EDD) the answer?

Reasons for Delay in an Agile Project

by Vikas Hazrati on  Dec 22, 2009 1

A delay, in general, is getting something done later than it was scheduled for thereby causing distress and inconvenience. Likewise, a delay is considered to be a waste in the Agile terminology. A delay causes discontinuity and thereby causes other wastes like relearning, task switching etc. A few Agilists discuss the common delays and ways to resolve them.

A Quick Look At The 7 Wastes of Software Development

by Mike Bria on  Aug 12, 2009

Fundamental to Lean Software Development is the pursuit of minimizing waste. The TPS publicized 7 primary wastes of manufacturing, and the Poppendiecks have since translated these wastes to our world of software development. Jack Mulinsky has recently been posting an introductory series on these wastes at agilesoftwaredevelopment.

Software Debt Adds Up to Substantive Costs

by Shane Hastie on  Aug 10, 2009 1

In a recent article entitled “Continued Delivery of High Values as Systems Age”, Chris Sterling discusses the concept of Software Debt – “Software debt accumulates when focus remains on immediate completion while neglecting changeability of the system over time.” Software Debt goes beyond technical debt an encompases a variety of aspects that impact on the ability to deliver value.

A Dollar Value On Pair Programming

by Mike Bria on  Jun 24, 2009 22

"Why in the world would we use two people to do the job of one?" This is often the initial reaction to people when first introduced to the idea of pair programming. In essence, they perceive pair programming as doubling the cost of writing any segment of code. Dave Nicollete offers some quantitive ideas to help show how pair programming can save money, not waste it.

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