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  • IAP: Fast, Versatile Alternative to HTTP

    Jakob Jenkov's organization has analyzed the modern application stack, including high level architectures, concrete technologies like databases, query languages, messaging, distributed computing models, & network protocols, and constructed the next gen alternative to HTTP. IAP is the resulting emerging standard protocol, and ION the high speed alternative to JSON and Protocol Buffers.

  • Next Generation Session Management with Spring Session

    Spring Session makes it easy to write horizontally scalable cloud applications, offload session state into specialized external session stores, and take advantage of current technologies such as WebSockets. This article takes a deep dive into using Spring Session to maximize these benefits, avoiding the limitations of traditional session management employed by enterprise Java

  • Randy Shoup and Andrew Phillips Answer Questions on Microservices

    Following the online webinar "Exploring the Uncharted Territory of Microservices" organized by XebiaLabs, which we covered in The Benefits of Microservices, Randy Shoup and Andrew Phillips answered a number of questions on microservices asked by participants.

  • Virtual Panel: Specification by Example, Executable Specifications, Scenarios and Feature Injection

    In the last couple of years terms like Specification by Example, Executable Specifications and Feature Injection have showed up quite frequently in the community, often in relation to Behaviour Driven Development (BDD) or tools like Cucumber or SpecFlow. InfoQ have talked to some of the leading experts in this domain about what these practices are and how they relate to BDD.

  • Resource-Oriented Architecture: Information, Not Containers

    The Web is known primarily as a Web of Documents because that has been our main experience with it, but we should not ignore the idea of documents as a data source. New technologies are emerging to make it easier to encode extractable content on the Web. This article focuses on how producers can increase the machine-processability of the documents they produce.

  • Resource-Oriented Architecture: Resource Metadata

    In this second article in the Resource-Oriented Architecture series, Brian Sletten discusses the benefits of REST, what constitutes a resource, associating metadata with a resource, the pitfalls of common models of resource metadata, SPARQL, RDF, expressing RDF facts, RDF triples, querying RDF, and sample RDF queries.

  • Resource-Oriented Architecture: The Rest of REST

    In this first article in the Resource-Oriented Architecture series, Brian Sletten discusses the REST architecture style, the history of SOA, SOAP and WS-*, the Semantic Web, URLs as identifiers, URIs and URNs, freedom of form, logically-connected late-binding systems, HATEOAS, and the impact of the Semantic Web upon software systems.

  • Wonderland Of SOA Governance

    Michael Poulin elaborates on the differences between of governance and management and tries to explore the 'wonderland' of governance in a service-oriented environment. He defines SOA Governance, explores the relationship between governance and enterprise architecture, and discusses accountability and ownership of governance efforts, and how practitioners can instrument SOA governance.

  • Encrypting the Internet

    The authors, from Intel, offer a three pronged approach to providing secure transmission of high volume HTML traffic: new CPU instructions to accelerate cryptographic operations; a novel implementation of the RSA algorithm to accelerate public key encryption; and using SMT to balance web server and cryptographic operations. Their approach, they claim, leads to significant cost savings.

  • RESTful HTTP in practice

    Gregor Roth overviews the basics of RESTful HTTP and discusses typical issues that developers face when they design RESTful HTTP applications, showing how to apply the REST architecture style in practice. Gregor describes commonly used approaches to name URIs, discusses how to interact with resources through the Uniform interface, when to use PUT or POST and how to support non-CRUD operations.

  • The First Few Milliseconds of an HTTPS Connection

    What exactly happens when an HTTPS connection is established? This article analyzes the data exchanged between the browser and the server, down to the byte, in order to set up a secured connection.

  • Why Do We Need Distributed OSGi?

    Recently, an early release draft of a Distributed OSGi requirements and design document has been published, long with a reference implementation as part of Apache CXF. In a new article, Eric Newcomer writes about the current status of distributed OSGi and explains the reasons for standardizing it in the first place, and its significance to the OSGi specification and community.

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